Aquaripure filter-Does it work? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 09-20-2011, 01:20 PM Thread Starter
Aquaripure filter-Does it work?

Has anyone ever tried using the Aquaripure filter (Aquaripure.com)?

You remove all biological media from the current filter being used. You then install the Aquaripure which is a stand alone filter. It claims to eliminate all nitrates making water changes of 35% needed only every 2 or 3 months. If this really works it would be great not to do as many water changes.

Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Trapperwolves
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post #2 of 6 Old 09-20-2011, 02:25 PM
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well, first off, water changes aren't primarily about nitrates, they are about the other chemicals (hormones and the like) that the fish naturally release into the water. those aren't broken down or used by plants and aren't always removed by filter material. in low quantities they aren't a problem, but if allowed to get too concentrated will be very stressful to the fish, which can in turn kill them. ammonia/nitrite/nitrates aren't the only organic chemicals you need to worry about, they're just the only ones you can easily test for.
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post #3 of 6 Old 09-20-2011, 07:55 PM
Yes, I believe it does work by culturing anaerobic bacteria that can process/neutralize nitrates.
However, Kendra is correct, there's more 'pollution' in old water - it's not all about nitrates.
I also think the ability to push out partial water changes is more important in salt water aquariums where mixing salt water adds complexity and expense (unless you're by the ocean).
For fresh water, you can't really beat a weekly 50% water change to freshen the water. Sure, it takes a little time, but it's the 'best medicine' to maintain a healthy tank.

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post #4 of 6 Old 09-20-2011, 08:18 PM
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My well water nitrates are at 20ppm right out of the fawcett. Im in the country around some farm animals causing my nitrates to be where they are.
I do at least a 30% water change every week. Would this type system help my situation at all?
Its been suggested to use a Phos reactor and Seachem De-Nitrate to run on the tank Its 90 gallons. I know it would probally help lower it down some. If it could be maintained at around 10ppm I would be happy. I do not have the tank over loaded by any means and never over feed. When you start with nitrates in the beggining they still build up fast. I run an Eheim 2075 filter which the primary and secondary pads are cleaned every two weeks and the complete filter cleaned once a month. No algae problems at all. Pristine water always. Ive also thought about Reverse Osmosis units. They are pretty costly and I talked with several manufactures of them They would not commit how much nitrate even at my 20ppm level they would remove. Alot of money to spend if it does not work.
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post #5 of 6 Old 09-20-2011, 08:27 PM Thread Starter
Thanks for your responses.

I really appreciate it,
Trapperwolves
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post #6 of 6 Old 09-21-2011, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woaussie View Post
My well water nitrates are at 20ppm right out of the fawcett. Im in the country around some farm animals causing my nitrates to be where they are.
I do at least a 30% water change every week. Would this type system help my situation at all?
Its been suggested to use a Phos reactor and Seachem De-Nitrate to run on the tank Its 90 gallons. I know it would probally help lower it down some. If it could be maintained at around 10ppm I would be happy. I do not have the tank over loaded by any means and never over feed. When you start with nitrates in the beggining they still build up fast. I run an Eheim 2075 filter which the primary and secondary pads are cleaned every two weeks and the complete filter cleaned once a month. No algae problems at all. Pristine water always. Ive also thought about Reverse Osmosis units. They are pretty costly and I talked with several manufactures of them They would not commit how much nitrate even at my 20ppm level they would remove. Alot of money to spend if it does not work.
The best solution in this case would be live plants.

And I completely agree with the posts of KendraMC and AbbeysDad on the value of water changes and there is absolutely no substitute.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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