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Any real need for canister/hang on back filter

This is a discussion on Any real need for canister/hang on back filter within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> To Nemo: no, I do not mind your addition. Again, I've been remiss in checking this forum out. Thunderloon: almost sounds like filter overkill. ...

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Any real need for canister/hang on back filter
Old 09-18-2012, 12:22 PM   #21
 
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To Nemo: no, I do not mind your addition. Again, I've been remiss in checking this forum out.
Thunderloon: almost sounds like filter overkill.
I was looking to eliminate a good portion of electric, but then I've probably gone up again as I have two led light fixtures on the tanks.
I am remiss in testing the water: nitrates are the only item I have a problem with.
If I ever get a single very very large tank, I may well invest in an Aquaripure.
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:02 AM   #22
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
It's interesting 'speak' of how a sponge filter may be better than a HOB. I suggest that not all HOB's are created equally. A cartridge type HOB does have limitations.

As food for thought, my AquaClear 70 HOB is filled with sponge material so we'd have to call it a HOB-sponge filter.
I pref. to think of the AC's as "open canister HOBs" because of their vertical pass flow, their actual flow rate per square inch is too high to qualify as canisters tho. An AC70 with the pump from a 20 would be more canister-like.

For quite a while it was common practice to simply fill canister filters with high density sponges, foam out-performed all the media available for quite a long time and was much cheaper and easier to maintain.
I remember seeing an early mod for a C220 which replaced the baskets with a piece of pipe and just used one enormous sponge stuck down in with the pipe thrust down through it to the gap at the bottom.
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:18 AM   #23
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderloon View Post
I pref. to think of the AC's as "open canister HOBs" because of their vertical pass flow, their actual flow rate per square inch is too high to qualify as canisters tho. An AC70 with the pump from a 20 would be more canister-like.
With a max flow rate of 300gph, the AC70 is on par with most canisters rated for the same size aquarium. I have mine modified and throttled down (max re-filtration/min outflow) to less than 100gph and with very fine media, <=50gph flow through. This would be <= the max flow rate for the AC20.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thunderloon View Post
For quite a while it was common practice to simply fill canister filters with high density sponges, foam out-performed all the media available for quite a long time and was much cheaper and easier to maintain.
I remember seeing an early mod for a C220 which replaced the baskets with a piece of pipe and just used one enormous sponge stuck down in with the pipe thrust down through it to the gap at the bottom.
I tend to agree. For all the hype of ceramic and other bio-media materials, open cell foam continues to be excellent at mechanical filtration as well as an excellent platform for beneficial biology. The Aquaripure bio-de-nitrate filter, as example, is all foam with 4 different density (coarse to fine) foams.
Now having 'said' this, there may be some room to entertain that ceramics and similar medias (e.g. Matrix/De*Nitrate) may emulate live rock in that they could support anaerobic de-nitrate bacteria where open cell foam most likely would not.
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Old 10-14-2012, 07:34 PM   #24
 
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I have some figures from an api liquid test kit.

No ammonia.
Ph: 7.8
did not test for nitrite: I don't think there are any
Nitrate: 10. It is usually 10 from the tap.
As far as I can tell, same figures from when I ran the canisters. Matter of fact, I think they are better.
I need to check the the water from the barrel, since I think the Ph is a little high. Need to know what the ph is from the tap.
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