Another stocking question :-)
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Another stocking question :-)

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Another stocking question :-)
Old 05-18-2011, 02:14 PM   #1
 
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Smile Another stocking question :-)

Hey all! Sorry that I've not been apart of this forum in a while. I have missed it!

Anyway I've got to down size here in the near future and I've got a 20g that I'm trying to condense into. I'm thinking about putting 7 Cherry Barbs (Puntius titteya), 6 Three Lined Corydoras (Corydoras trilineatus), and 5-6 Cardinal Tetra (Paracheirodon axelrodi). I know that is a handful of fish especially for a 20g. I've got a marineland c 160 canister filter rated at 30g and the tank is fairly planted. The web site that I've seen used on here before aqadvsior says that I'd be slightly over stocked with all that.

What do you think? Would I be better off with just the barbs and corys and leaving out the tetras or would everything work out alright?

Thanks everybody!

Michael
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Old 05-19-2011, 10:08 AM   #2
 
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If you already have all these fish, then this can work with good maintenance (weekly partial water changes of 40%, good plant growth, minimal feeding). But I would not recommend it from scratch, if you do not already have these fish, if this is a 20g high.

If starting from scratch, in a 20g high I would have the 5 corys and a shoal of cardinal tetra, 7-8. That's it. Or the corys and just the 7 cherry barb. If it is a 20g long, you are even better, and both cardinals and cherrys (7 each) plus the corys would be OK.

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Old 05-19-2011, 05:39 PM   #3
 
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Thanks Byron, That is pretty much what I was expecting and planning on.

Interesting that you say that it would be alright to have that mix in a 20g long. Is that because there is more area for the tetras and barbs to be in without standing on top of eachother so to say?


Thank you

Michael
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Old 05-19-2011, 08:04 PM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by doughnut View Post
Thanks Byron, That is pretty much what I was expecting and planning on.

Interesting that you say that it would be alright to have that mix in a 20g long. Is that because there is more area for the tetras and barbs to be in without standing on top of eachother so to say?


Thank you

Michael
Yes. Long tanks are always preferable to high tanks with most forest fish. They tend to live in shallow creeks and streams so this sort of replicates their natural environment. Long tanks are easier to aquascape generally, and the advantage with this is in providing more of a natural environment. You can create a nice stream look with some wood laid lengthwise, plants, maybe some rounded pebbles, sand, etc. This provides more swimming room. And more area for territories, hiding spots, etc.

The other issue is that the increased surface area allows more gas exchange, so naturally (within reason) more fish can go in the tank. It is not the volume but the area that is important here. Of course, volume is important too, but there is some flexibility.

The difference of 6 inches between the 24-inch 20g tall and the 30-inch 20g long may not seem like much, but in fact it is something of a world of a difference to the fish and to the stocking.
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Old 05-20-2011, 11:17 AM   #5
 
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Perfectly sensible.

Well I got to thinking again which seems to put me into trouble most times, but what would you think about adding a trio of otos (once some algae had built up a bit)? Would that be too many for a small space that they'd compete for food?


Michael
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Old 05-20-2011, 11:50 AM   #6
 
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Perfectly sensible.

Well I got to thinking again which seems to put me into trouble most times, but what would you think about adding a trio of otos (once some algae had built up a bit)? Would that be too many for a small space that they'd compete for food?


Michael
If you like otos as a fish (as opposed to getting them solely for "algae") a trip would work. I would consider a Farlowella vittata myself, as it is more interesting, and incredible at eating common green algae or diatoms [same as otos here]. But they do need soft slightly acidic water, but then so do otos (they are all wild caught) though otos may be a bit more adaptable. In either case, make sure there is algae or they may well starve initially. Both will learn to accept (and relish) sinking foods, but at first the real stuff is often necessary.
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Old 05-21-2011, 07:40 PM   #7
 
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If you like otos as a fish (as opposed to getting them solely for "algae") a trip would work. I would consider a Farlowella vittata myself, as it is more interesting, and incredible at eating common green algae or diatoms [same as otos here]. But they do need soft slightly acidic water, but then so do otos (they are all wild caught) though otos may be a bit more adaptable. In either case, make sure there is algae or they may well starve initially. Both will learn to accept (and relish) sinking foods, but at first the real stuff is often necessary.
At your recommendation I looked up the Farlowella vittata and it seems like everybody that has one is very interested by it. I even followed your 10 page report on them spawning in your tanks and that is a task not easily done on a smart phone. Haha.

So in the profile it says it can attain about 5 inches. Do you think that would be pushing the limit in a 20 gallon? I have not seen them in my local fish stores but I would like to see if they can get them and how much they cost.

Thank you
Michael
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Old 05-22-2011, 11:43 AM   #8
 
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At your recommendation I looked up the Farlowella vittata and it seems like everybody that has one is very interested by it. I even followed your 10 page report on them spawning in your tanks and that is a task not easily done on a smart phone. Haha.

So in the profile it says it can attain about 5 inches. Do you think that would be pushing the limit in a 20 gallon? I have not seen them in my local fish stores but I would like to see if they can get them and how much they cost.

Thank you
Michael
This is a prime example of where a fish's length has less significance than it otherwise would. There are many factors that affect a fish's suitability to an aquarium. In the case of this species, the length may be 5 inches but the fish is basically inactive. It does not swim, it will almost always be perched on a leaf, rock, wood branch, etc. either grazing or simply resting still. This means it needs very little physical "space." Secondly, this species' small girth also means very little impact on the biology in the tank. A 5-inch Hypancistrus furunculus by contrast would be way too big for a 20g both for its size (visual) and its impact on the tank.

Just make sure of the species. "Farlowella" or "Twig Cat" is often used in stores for several quite different species, from the small one we are here considering to the "Royal Farlowella" species that are very large by comparison.

Byron.
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