Amazon Tank? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 02:33 PM Thread Starter
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In this response post, I am only going to deal with one issue--community fish. You cannot put any mix of fish in the same tank. All the fish in a given aquarium must, and I repeat, must have the same requirements with respect to

(1) water parameters (pH, hardness, temperature). Some fish adapt somewhat, others cannot. First know what comes out of your tap, then decide if you will have fish that can manage in that water, or if you intend adjusting the hardness/pH by natural means, not chemicals which will not work.

(2) water movement, determined by the filter. There are slow-water fish that will literally burn out having to battle against a constant current, and there are fish that need such a current or they will suffocate. You generally cannot mix the two because you can't create two different environments, although a slight overlap will work with the right filter and tank setup and certain fish.

(3) environment, by which I mean the aquascaping. There are fish that absolutely must have wood, or rock caves, or specific substrate, or plants, or floating plants; this must be considered when selecting possible fish.

(4) lighting: there are fish that will not be "comfortable" under lights, so minimal lighting is chosen, plus floating plants help in this. If plants are in the tank, the lighting has to be sufficient while still keeping in mind the fish's needs. Some plants do better than others under different lighting.

(5) behavioural compatibility; sedate fish do not last long with active fish that constantly disturb them. Some fish will nip fins and can't be kept with slow sedate long-fin fish like angels. Some catfish will harass other fish particularly bottom fish to death. All of this has to be considered.

The information in our fish profiles addresses all these issues.

The first thing is to know the water parameters; then decide on fish accordingly.
how can I change my water quality? I dont know how to check what kind it is.
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post #12 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 03:39 PM
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how can I change my water quality? I dont know how to check what kind it is.
You should get yourself a pH test kit, this is one thing that should be regularly checked as it can be advance warning of impending trouble if the pH suddenly shifts. There are a couple of ranges available, the normal range, the high range (for hard alkaline water) and the4 low range (for soft acidic water). Before spending money on one of these, contact your local water supply people.

Some have a website where they post info on the water. Look for pH and hardness, which might be general hardness, carbonate hardness, or calcium, bicarbonates, etc. If you find their site and give me the link I can look at it. If they don't have a site, just call them and ask for the hardness (both GH and KH) and pH. This is public information as it deals with the quality of our water. Once you know their numbers, the hardness is not likely to change; but the pH in the tank can, so get a test kit suited to the range they indicate for pH. API liquid (as opposed to strips) test kits are good quality.

Explaining how to change the parameters is very involved. Let's find out what you have, and what you want (for the fish you'd like to have), before going down that road.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #13 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 03:53 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
You should get yourself a pH test kit, this is one thing that should be regularly checked as it can be advance warning of impending trouble if the pH suddenly shifts. There are a couple of ranges available, the normal range, the high range (for hard alkaline water) and the4 low range (for soft acidic water). Before spending money on one of these, contact your local water supply people.

Some have a website where they post info on the water. Look for pH and hardness, which might be general hardness, carbonate hardness, or calcium, bicarbonates, etc. If you find their site and give me the link I can look at it. If they don't have a site, just call them and ask for the hardness (both GH and KH) and pH. This is public information as it deals with the quality of our water. Once you know their numbers, the hardness is not likely to change; but the pH in the tank can, so get a test kit suited to the range they indicate for pH. API liquid (as opposed to strips) test kits are good quality.

Explaining how to change the parameters is very involved. Let's find out what you have, and what you want (for the fish you'd like to have), before going down that road.
I literary juyst called them,. They said I need to know my system. So Iam calling my father to know. In any case I know a petstore that does freee water tests. Sooo yeah.

In any case is there any type of fish that can tolerate all ranges of ph and hardness? This is too hard. I mean Ivedhad goldfish and they have been doing fine so far.
Ived also had gouramis and minnows. Though the only thing that died where the minnows.
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post #14 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 04:19 PM
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There is no tropical freshwater fish that can be healthy and live a normal life in very acidic or very hard water interchangeably. All fish are adapted to a range somewhere between soft and acidic at the lower end and hard and alkaline at the higher end. Many manage well in the "middle." But we need toknow your water, so when that info is available we can discuss this further. Otherwise we are just guessing and getting very involved technically with perhaps no need to.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #15 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 04:33 PM Thread Starter
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There is no tropical freshwater fish that can be healthy and live a normal life in very acidic or very hard water interchangeably. All fish are adapted to a range somewhere between soft and acidic at the lower end and hard and alkaline at the higher end. Many manage well in the "middle." But we need toknow your water, so when that info is available we can discuss this further. Otherwise we are just guessing and getting very involved technically with perhaps no need to.
Do they sell a water testing kit for hardness?
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post #16 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 05:16 PM
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Do they sell a water testing kit for hardness?
Yes. But once you know the hardness of the source water, you will never use it again. Unless you go down the road of adjusting hardness. I have a kit, as I was doing this in a couple of my tanks last year. That experiment concluded, and I haven't used the test since, no reason; I know what the tap water is, and I know it will not change in an aquarium unless I deliberately harden or soften it.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 05:26 PM Thread Starter
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Yes. But once you know the hardness of the source water, you will never use it again. Unless you go down the road of adjusting hardness. I have a kit, as I was doing this in a couple of my tanks last year. That experiment concluded, and I haven't used the test since, no reason; I know what the tap water is, and I know it will not change in an aquarium unless I deliberately harden or soften it.
What do you mean by that statement "yes but once you know the hardness of the source you will never use it again"??? Iam not super bright. So that threw me off.

Honestly how do you delibaretly change the hardness and ph of the water? I have this powder that is for african cichlids and it makes the water hard to a certain degree like the ph puts it at 7.0 or so. Iam thinking In any case Ill just go with one razor back musk turtle and fill the tank up with tons of plants. Id like to use a water hycanth on the top since I read it eats either nitrates or nitrites(the really bad kind). I still want to use both filters for maximum filtration but Ill be sure to adjust the current output. I think if I put in more of those macaronis that harvest good bacteria that I will be able to slow the filter a bit. In any case my friend also said I should use a diatom filter, that it eats up all the bad stuff in the water. Is this true? I wanted to havea mud turtle rather than a musk, but then mud turtles need more land and a razor back musk turtle can go in a tank with 20inches of depth of water. Iam going over to a petstore tonight to see about the ph. My mom is giving me the source of our water or rather trying to find it. Ill see about all of this, in the mean time could you perhaps tell me how to change the water quality?
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post #18 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 07:42 PM
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Once you know the hardness of your tap water, that's it. It is not going to change, or is extremely unlikely too, because hardness is determined by what's in the water from where it comes from, and most water supplies are constant.

I won't comment on water for turtles because I do not know that species well enough.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #19 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 07:48 PM Thread Starter
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Once you know the hardness of your tap water, that's it. It is not going to change, or is extremely unlikely too, because hardness is determined by what's in the water from where it comes from, and most water supplies are constant.

I won't comment on water for turtles because I do not know that species well enough.
My father doesn't want me to call the water company for some reason. So is there another way I can find out the hardness? Like is there any kind of way I can do this on my own?
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post #20 of 24 Old 09-13-2010, 08:07 PM
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My father doesn't want me to call the water company for some reason. So is there another way I can find out the hardness? Like is there any kind of way I can do this on my own?
They probably have a website.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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