Alternate for Neons? - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 01:07 PM Thread Starter
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Because of their size theyre getting caught in the filter. I lost 3 yesterday because of it.
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post #12 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 01:11 PM
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You could get a cover for the hose that sucks up the water. Also, you might be able to adjust the suction on it so it's no so strong. Fish a little bigger than Neon's could still get caught in the filter, just not sucked up. Just a suggestion.
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post #13 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 01:11 PM
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No I dont think it's the size.. Unless you're filter is much too strong. It's more likely neon disease. Which no one really knows what that is, or what causes it. Just that the various neon species and cardinals have shown the same symptoms of weakness and being pulled into filters.
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post #14 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
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Well the neons dont get sucked up they get sucked like half way into the hose, so the disease sounds likely. And i cant adjust it. I have harlequins and the filter dosnt bother them at all.
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post #15 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 01:39 PM Thread Starter
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Since last i was on, I have lost another Neon. :(
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post #16 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 01:49 PM
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I would suspect something is causing this, not the fish's size. We need to know more about this tank. What is the GH and pH? What is the nitrate? I assume ammonia and nitrite were zero throughout? Are there live plants? What sort of filter, and what is the flow through the tank?
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Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #17 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 02:06 PM Thread Starter
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Everything is as should be. Ph is around 7.0. All live plants. Flow is not to strong but has some current to it.
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post #18 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 03:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tannerj View Post
Everything is as should be. Ph is around 7.0. All live plants. Flow is not to strong but has some current to it.
I don't know what "as it should be" means to you when it comes to GH or nitrates. And either could be the cause of some of the problem.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #19 of 27 Old 02-23-2013, 08:21 PM Thread Starter
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I havent been able to test for nitrates, i just redid my tank last night. But this has been happening for the last week
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post #20 of 27 Old 02-24-2013, 11:26 AM
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I havent been able to test for nitrates, i just redid my tank last night. But this has been happening for the last week
We can't diagnose the problem without all the facts. What I can say is that fish will not get pulled into the filter unless either the filter is too strong or the fish is weakened by something.

A nitrate test kit is one of the basics you should have, along with a pH test. Ammonia and nitrite are advisable during the initial couple years, less necessary after that if you have a planted tank. But both pH and nitrates can tell you a lot about issues in the tank, as these can quite suddenly change.

If nitrates are high, it weakens fish, and this can be the start of other problems. And I asked about GH because neons are soft water fish, and the harder the water, the harder they will struggle just to "live" day to day. And this too weakens them. The GH you can ascertain from the municipal water supply folks, probably from their website.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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