Alright i wanna do a switch a roo
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Alright i wanna do a switch a roo

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Alright i wanna do a switch a roo
Old 08-08-2011, 01:02 AM   #1
 
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Alright i wanna do a switch a roo

What i have is a total of 4 tanks i can set up, well 5 but the 5th wont have a very good filter, the filter is ment for at most 6 gallons, but i figured i could use it temp on a 10 gallon with baby fry in it for a bit



I want to move around fish from my tanks

Tank sizes are...
29 gallon
20 gallon
14 gallon
2. 10 gallons



The fish...
2 Gold gouramis
1 Blue Gourami
2 Mollies
2 sword/platy crosses
2 guppies
4 platies
6 black skirted tetra
7 danios
2 neon tetra(going to get more)
2 red eyed tetra(same, getting more)
3 cherry barbs (as stated above)
1 preicella tetra (stated above)
and 9 fry(for sure guppy, and other 2 or 3 are either platy or molly, got from the petstore so not sure)



The only fish that dont get along is the 1 blue Gourami with the 2 golds, the golds are fine together and the blue prefers to have nothing to do with them


So any suggestions?
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Old 08-08-2011, 11:10 AM   #2
 
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If the blue is aggressive to the golds, they should be separated. In a 4-foot or larger tank this can work, but not in those tanks you mention. The Blue is likely a male, and male gourami are territorial and can be aggressive to other gourami and sometimes other fish. It's their nature. The golds in the 29g, the blue in the 20g. Assuming you want to keep these.

This causes problems. Black Widow Tetra are known to be nippers, and gourami are a great temptation. In a large tank and with more in the group (the tetra) this might come off, but it might not. And the tetra should be in nothing less than the 29g. So here is a problem, gourami and tetra, one should go.

On the various other tetra, I agree they need larger groups, minimum 6, but you have insufficient tank space for so many fish. And again, the gourami are limiting you in the two largest tanks.

My suggestion is to cull out some fish (stores will sometimes exchange, other aquarists). There are simply too many different species to be adequately housed in numbers, with the tanks available.

Byron.
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Old 08-08-2011, 02:11 PM   #3
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
If the blue is aggressive to the golds, they should be separated. In a 4-foot or larger tank this can work, but not in those tanks you mention. The Blue is likely a male, and male gourami are territorial and can be aggressive to other gourami and sometimes other fish. It's their nature. The golds in the 29g, the blue in the 20g. Assuming you want to keep these.

This causes problems. Black Widow Tetra are known to be nippers, and gourami are a great temptation. In a large tank and with more in the group (the tetra) this might come off, but it might not. And the tetra should be in nothing less than the 29g. So here is a problem, gourami and tetra, one should go.

On the various other tetra, I agree they need larger groups, minimum 6, but you have insufficient tank space for so many fish. And again, the gourami are limiting you in the two largest tanks.

My suggestion is to cull out some fish (stores will sometimes exchange, other aquarists). There are simply too many different species to be adequately housed in numbers, with the tanks available.

Byron.
the blue and golds are not together, and the blue is actually a female, and does great with my other fish, and my black skirted tetra havent been fin nippers at all? trust me i would know, i sit in the spare room watching all my tanks for hours sometimes
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Old 08-08-2011, 04:59 PM   #4
 
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Originally Posted by alysalouise View Post
the blue and golds are not together, and the blue is actually a female, and does great with my other fish, and my black skirted tetra havent been fin nippers at all? trust me i would know, i sit in the spare room watching all my tanks for hours sometimes
Not yet maybe...but...

I'm sorry but I get this so often I have to respond. Fish are natural creatures, and they have natural inherent traits that none of us can change. It's the way they are. Now having said that, some fish seem to act contrary to the norm for their species; I don't know why, but it happens. [Only today another member commented on an aggressive rasbora that was causing havoc to the other fish; this is certainly contrary to the norm for this species. These things happen.]

The information in the profiles concerning temperament and compatibility is the collected evidence of hundreds if not thousands of fish for each species, carefully observed by hundreds of aquarists and biologists. It is wise to pay attention to such wisdom, because one never knows what may trigger a fish's natural instincts.

For example, shoaling fish are recommended to be kept in groups, most usually suggest six or more. There is good reason for this. We now have scientific studies that have determined that maintaining shoaling fish in groups less than six will cause them to be considerably more aggressive; if they are naturally an aggressive species, such as Tiger Barb or Serpae Tetra, this aggression is heightened, or usually will be. If they are a normally peaceful species, say Neon Tetra, they may suddenly or slowly develop aggressive habits. In both cases, this is out of frustration will being kept in an inadequate environment--too few in the group, too small a tank, etc. It is the fish's only way of dealing with this frustration--it just lashes out. The point here is that ignoring the proven fact and keeping a pair or trio of some shoaling fish may or may not work, but the probability is that in time it won't. Why risk the fish?

Black Skirt Tetra are known for being fin nippers. Hundreds of aquarists have evidence. That this or that group of fish may or may not be, is one of those mysteries. But it is a probable. Something may ignite it down the raod, and the fish will lash out.

There have been many threads on here about fish behaviour, where this or that fish seems to be a model of deportment. Then one day it kills a couple of tankmates. You just don't know. But the safest course is to assume the fish will live up to its inherent traits sooner or later, and set up your community accordingly. That way, you are certainly less likely to have trouble down the road. You may not anyway--but you don't know, and neither do I. We can only assume wisely that the fish will be itself.

I do a fair bit of hiking in forested areas where there are black bear. Most will tell you to avoid them, they may attack, particularly if they sense you are carrying food. I have seen several in my hikes. The fact that none of them have ever come after me does not mean all bears are "safe." I must still take that advice and avoid them, or one day it may be the last.
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Old 08-08-2011, 05:12 PM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Not yet maybe...but...

I'm sorry but I get this so often I have to respond. Fish are natural creatures, and they have natural inherent traits that none of us can change. It's the way they are. Now having said that, some fish seem to act contrary to the norm for their species; I don't know why, but it happens. [Only today another member commented on an aggressive rasbora that was causing havoc to the other fish; this is certainly contrary to the norm for this species. These things happen.]

The information in the profiles concerning temperament and compatibility is the collected evidence of hundreds if not thousands of fish for each species, carefully observed by hundreds of aquarists and biologists. It is wise to pay attention to such wisdom, because one never knows what may trigger a fish's natural instincts.

For example, shoaling fish are recommended to be kept in groups, most usually suggest six or more. There is good reason for this. We now have scientific studies that have determined that maintaining shoaling fish in groups less than six will cause them to be considerably more aggressive; if they are naturally an aggressive species, such as Tiger Barb or Serpae Tetra, this aggression is heightened, or usually will be. If they are a normally peaceful species, say Neon Tetra, they may suddenly or slowly develop aggressive habits. In both cases, this is out of frustration will being kept in an inadequate environment--too few in the group, too small a tank, etc. It is the fish's only way of dealing with this frustration--it just lashes out. The point here is that ignoring the proven fact and keeping a pair or trio of some shoaling fish may or may not work, but the probability is that in time it won't. Why risk the fish?

Black Skirt Tetra are known for being fin nippers. Hundreds of aquarists have evidence. That this or that group of fish may or may not be, is one of those mysteries. But it is a probable. Something may ignite it down the raod, and the fish will lash out.

There have been many threads on here about fish behaviour, where this or that fish seems to be a model of deportment. Then one day it kills a couple of tankmates. You just don't know. But the safest course is to assume the fish will live up to its inherent traits sooner or later, and set up your community accordingly. That way, you are certainly less likely to have trouble down the road. You may not anyway--but you don't know, and neither do I. We can only assume wisely that the fish will be itself.

I do a fair bit of hiking in forested areas where there are black bear. Most will tell you to avoid them, they may attack, particularly if they sense you are carrying food. I have seen several in my hikes. The fact that none of them have ever come after me does not mean all bears are "safe." I must still take that advice and avoid them, or one day it may be the last.


I've had them for over a year, and still nothing, they are kept in a group and i find them to be fine, colors are great they aren't faded, and none of the other fish seem frightend by them, so ill take my chances, i asked for idea on what fish i should put in which tank for a beautiful display, i wasn't asking information on my fish in this thread, if it were a thread that i was asking what these fish act like and so on i would be more than thankful for your useful information. But okay ill just keep in mind not to ask these kinds of questions again, and have my tank mates be a mystery to you all.

Last edited by alysalouise; 08-08-2011 at 05:23 PM..
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Old 08-08-2011, 05:32 PM   #6
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alysalouise View Post
I've had them for over a year, and still nothing, they are kept in a group and i find them to be fine, colors are great they aren't faded, and none of the other fish seem frightend by them, so ill take my chances, i asked for idea on what fish i should put in which tank for a beautiful display, i wasn't asking information on my fish in this thread, if it were a thread that i was asking what these fish act like and so on i would be more than thankful for your useful information. But okay ill just keep in mind not to ask these kinds of questions again, and have my tank mates be a mystery to you all.
I believe my initial response was in direct response to your question. You asked about which fish together in which tank, and I simply pointed out that some of the fish should not be together. I am not going to tell anyone how to set up their tanks. But I will comment on problems that I notice.

This forum is meant to be a source of helpful information and advice to those wanting it. There are many members here with considerable experience and knowledge. If we are not truthful in responding to posts, there wouldn't be much point in any of us being here.
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Old 08-08-2011, 06:29 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alysalouise View Post
I've had them for over a year, and still nothing, they are kept in a group and i find them to be fine, colors are great they aren't faded, and none of the other fish seem frightend by them, so ill take my chances, i asked for idea on what fish i should put in which tank for a beautiful display, i wasn't asking information on my fish in this thread, if it were a thread that i was asking what these fish act like and so on i would be more than thankful for your useful information. But okay ill just keep in mind not to ask these kinds of questions again, and have my tank mates be a mystery to you all.

Part of what I find for having a beautiful display is choosing fish that will work well together, which includes what their behaviors are. Some fish will work better with others while some don't. When it comes down to it you are the one who decides how you want to stock your tanks, the members here only try to offer suggestions based on knowledge and experience that they have to help you in being able to do this. All they are, are suggestions to try to help you and your fish
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