Algae Issues
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Algae Issues

This is a discussion on Algae Issues within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Well, I've had a small planted aquarium for over a year now, and it's booming. I just recently transferred all the plants (and bought ...

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Old 01-22-2010, 07:55 PM   #1
 
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Red face Algae Issues

Well, I've had a small planted aquarium for over a year now, and it's booming. I just recently transferred all the plants (and bought a couple more!) to a ten gallon with better lighting, filtration, etc. I have quite a few plants, the get about 8.5 hrs a day of light, and "flourish" fertilizer whenever I remember.

The issue I have always had with my planted aquariums is algae. Not the greenish/brownish type that slowly builds on aquarium glass either. And the three otocinclus I have in the tank won't touch it, or maybe the just can't take it out, I'm not sure.

The algae grows in super bright green gooey mats and comes back quite quickly. It has been especially harmful to my feathery-leafed plants. I keep things maintained by removing the algae, but does anyone have a better solution? Different fish, different something else? Shrimp?

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Old 01-22-2010, 08:18 PM   #2
 
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Your description sounds like cyanobacteria, but maybe brush algae, so let's positively identify what you have since methods to deal with these differ. Can you remove it easily with your fingers, and it slides off like a slimy mat?

Byron.
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Old 01-23-2010, 10:50 AM   #3
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Your description sounds like cyanobacteria, but maybe brush algae, so let's positively identify what you have since methods to deal with these differ. Can you remove it easily with your fingers, and it slides off like a slimy mat?

Byron.

Yes, it comes right off with a rub, and will float and I can grab it.
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Old 01-23-2010, 11:30 AM   #4
 
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It may be of interest for you dealing with cyanobacteria to read over this thread http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...lackout-35508/
I had the same issue as Hawkin last Nov and also for me, doing a full black out for few days followed by a good gravel vacuum eliminated mine for good since then (also as with Hawkin, it didn't upset my plants nor fish in this process.)
Once you've successfully battled your algae problem, I'd also suggest to dial up your lights to ~10hrs/day to help it be more balanced between your lights and fertilizer.
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Old 01-23-2010, 11:34 AM   #5
 
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I would suggest that thread too, some members with good experience (not meaning me by the way) with this posted at length. I have no doubt whatsoever that it is an organics issue, as my experience related there also shows. B.
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Old 01-23-2010, 11:44 AM   #6
 
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Maybe to go into a lil more detail w/out trying to post you a book here from my experience with growing (unwillingly) several types of algae in one of my new tank....
It often then occurs when tanks are newly set up and the tanks are not established yet and/ or the needed balances is out of wack (between nutrition available, plants, light., fish).
It can then be negatively enhance by either no maintaining your filter at all; OR maintaining it too much, again its about the right balance.
It can further be negatively enhanced by the water quality; which means too much food you're giving your fish and/ or too little weekly water exchanges. The food can easly be controlled by simply feeding every 2nd day.
For your particular algae also poor water circulation in certain areas of the tank play a role.

So all these named factors must be evaluated carefully, you seeing your tank and knowing what you're doing (or not doing) can do this far better then us far away.

This particular type loves growing on the gravel and glass near the front of your tank, some people also had success taping the front of the tank 'dark' with some tape & newspaper to block out access lights; personally I wanted to remove the algae period and not upset the look of my tanks with newspapers.

When I battled mine, I brought in thick blankets and towels and covered it up entirely with lights off for 4 days. After that when I took the blankets off all spots that previously had the green slime now looked like lil gray dust bunnies. I super vacuumed ALL of my gravel which resulted in ~60-70% water change that day, refilled with conditioned water and its been gone since then.

Please let me know how I can help you best; I have walked several people through this process over the last month via PM's & posts and so far been successful (see Hawkins post being the latest "PM consultation" lol).
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Old 01-23-2010, 11:45 AM   #7
 
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PS Maybe if you have the opportunity take a picture and post it for us; just so we can be 110% certain this IS indeed the type we're battling against
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Old 01-23-2010, 09:42 PM   #8
 
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Wow!

Thanks for all the great info! I will definitely try a blackout on this!

So the fish and plants won't be upset by this? My plants love the high light!

Unfortunately, I've already scraped the infestation today, so there's nothing to take a picture of.
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Old 01-24-2010, 12:29 PM   #9
 
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Originally Posted by Kaddock View Post
Wow!

Thanks for all the great info! I will definitely try a blackout on this!

So the fish and plants won't be upset by this? My plants love the high light!

Unfortunately, I've already scraped the infestation today, so there's nothing to take a picture of.
What specifically is your light, by which I mean the type of tube/bulb, wattage and kelvin rating?

You need to find the source, which is organics/nutrients in excess, and the light is probably a factor.
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Old 01-24-2010, 01:07 PM   #10
 
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Sorryfor the long post prior...just wanted to hand you all info's I could

Like I said earlier on, you need to look at what's causing this imbalance in your tank. The blackout will eliminate it for now, but if the imbalance is not eliminated I guarantee you it'll come back (food light, water exchanges.....)

No nor plants or fish will get upset with a black out, apart from my statement feel free to read Hawkins post, no one upset there neither.

If yu have taken it off today: Go from there....Tell us about your food, lights, water changes and let's go from there to stop the cause of it for good.
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