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Algae (?) Help please.

This is a discussion on Algae (?) Help please. within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> When you have yours in the sun Cole.... do you also run the tank lights? Tank gallons? Light? Wpg etc........

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Algae (?) Help please.
Old 01-23-2013, 02:23 PM   #31
 
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When you have yours in the sun Cole.... do you also run the tank lights?
Tank gallons? Light? Wpg etc.....
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Old 01-23-2013, 02:32 PM   #32
 
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When you have yours in the sun Cole.... do you also run the tank lights?
Tank gallons? Light? Wpg etc.....
all day sunlight only five gal gets leds no other light except sun for big one both side by side aslo big one is 40-50 gal when sundown at 6.00 the lights go off the 5-gal weird right?lol don`t feel right putting myself on the spotlight when it is the other person`s forum page but happy to share don`t think i don`t want you asking so go ahead and ask

Last edited by Cole mccallister; 01-23-2013 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 01-23-2013, 02:52 PM   #33
 
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This might come across as terrible.... I don't entirely get that last post. Think indoors. But not sure.
Could you simplify and clear it up some?
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Old 01-23-2013, 03:09 PM   #34
 
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hmm i don`t know what to say to this but algae is not always light related . . .
You're right, Cole - algae issues are NOT always light-related, and I've (unfortunately) experienced this first-hand! Algae is always present in any aquarium, but it's when there is an imbalance in the system that it is able to get a foothold and really flourish. Finding the proper balance between lighting, nutrients, Co2 (both added and/or naturally-occurring), is tricky. Even cleaning routines (phosphates) and temperature can have a direct effect on algae growth. If any one element is off, then the dreaded green goblin is able to take over, as algae are quick to adapt and take advantage of anything that will help them to thrive. . . far quicker than the plants we want to keep pretty and algae-free. But since most of us have no real way to monitor and test such things, the process of finding the proper balance is more or less guesswork.

From what I have seen, algae seems to bloom more readily in a new tank, because it is not fully established yet, and everything is still very much in flux within the baby ecosystem that is being established. I've found that in many cases the tank owner is doing everything right, but when the plants new (this sometimes depends on the TYPE of plant), they go through an adjustment period, often called 'transplantation shock' in terrestrial plants, during which time they are adapting to the conditions in their new home. During this time, things can be especially tricky and algae is very often able to bloom, as plants tend to go dormant while they're adjusting - and so aren't taking in as many nutrients or growing as quickly as they can be. Because of this, I like to add plants like duckweed, and a lot of fast-growing stem plants to any new system. These can be removed later, but I have found that they are more readily able to uptake the excess nutrients, etc, while the other plants settle in and the tank begins to mature.

That said, I have found, through both personal experience, as well as in following the tanks of others, that more often than not, light does tend to be the element that is out of balance (especially in low-tech tanks). . . and because of that, most people will advise to start by adjusting the photo-period/lighting to help eliminate, or at least slow the algae growth. . .and *usually,* it works!

. . . but what do I know I'm new at this, too - I just read entirely too many books and web-pages!

Last edited by Chesh; 01-23-2013 at 03:19 PM..
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Old 01-23-2013, 03:55 PM   #35
 
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Brush algae is impossible to remove from plant leaves; even on wood it is very difficult. It attaches firmly. I see it on moss up near the surface (more light) if I am not careful with the light, but controlling the light has prevented this. When it does occur, I just pull off that bit of moss--but as someone said, solve the balance first or it will just keep coming back.

Balance is indeed the key, and it is perfectly true that algae needs more than light. But in planted tanks, our aim should always be to have light the limiting factor to plant growth. This means that everything else is available (all 17 nutrients) and we just make sure the light is not too intense and/or too long in duration. CO2 is the tricky issue here, since we are not adding it. So the light must not go beyond sufficient CO2.

Someone mentioned water flow. Brush algae can be worse in stronger water flows, which is one reason it is always clogging spray bars and filter intake screens. At least mine does.

Byron.
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Old 01-23-2013, 05:36 PM   #36
 
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This might come across as terrible.... I don't entirely get that last post. Think indoors. But not sure.
Could you simplify and clear it up some?
Yes in doors and yes light runs with sunlight coming as the big one does not have lights in the big one i I turn off the tank lights when night comes a usually no often I hear light is a factor when it really all depends on everything as factors
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:56 PM   #37
 
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Lighting at 4 hours for second day.
Took wood out with moss on it. Placed into freezing cold water. Swished my hands over it. Left out of water for 10. Put back in tank. 90% gone. The algae. Lol.
Leaves on plants also nearly clear. Think another day or 2 of reduced lighting and algae go bye bye
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Old 01-24-2013, 05:18 PM   #38
 
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Sounds good! I've never heard of the freezing water trick, lol... sounds... dramatic! Hope it works, and doesn't harm the moss - it sounds like things are under control - hopefully never to return!
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