Aggressive swordtail
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Aggressive swordtail

This is a discussion on Aggressive swordtail within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Is there a way for me to separate an aggressive sword fish from the other in the tank without my having a net or ...

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Old 08-23-2010, 10:27 PM   #1
 
Aggressive swordtail

Is there a way for me to separate an aggressive sword fish from the other in the tank without my having a net or special container?

Of the two sword tails I bought yesterday, one is showing aggressive behavior, that I've just witnessed for myself tonight, although he's already killed one of my red min tetras and now a ruby tetra has his dorsal fin ripped quite badly as well as a sunburst has a nip out of his tail and another red min tetra has had his dorsal fin bit as well.

I want to take both the sword tails back to the pet shop after work tomorrow, but I have a feeling I'll wake up to more dead fish tomorrow morning and come home to dead fish tomorrow night if I can't separate him first.

Is there anything I can rig up to use as a temporary pen that someone on this board may have tried and had success with?
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Old 08-23-2010, 11:32 PM   #2
 
Disregard my question. I managed to get these two fish back to the pet store just as they were closing. Phew, my fish can sleep well tonight!
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Old 08-24-2010, 03:26 AM   #3
 
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Hi, and welcome to Tropical Fish Keeping forum.

And welcome to a fellow BC-er. Where abouts are you, if I may ask. As you can see, I'm in Vancouver--actually Pitt Meadows.

Glad you solved the problem. Swords can be nasty like that; I would suggest not mixing them (or other livebearers) with smaller quiet fish like tetra. They need different water parameters too, swords need basic harder water while the tetra are better in soft slightly acidic water.

Byron.
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Old 08-26-2010, 01:09 AM   #4
 
Hi Bryon,

I'm on the island. Nice to meet a fellow BC-er!

The research for the right mix of fish can be a tad annoying, different information from several websites; from how many to purchase, to food, water and light conditions, the info is all over the board it seems. I don't want any aggressive fish in my tank, just some nice colorful quiet little guys to watch.
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Old 08-26-2010, 01:31 AM   #5
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oceans View Post
Hi Bryon,

I'm on the island. Nice to meet a fellow BC-er!

The research for the right mix of fish can be a tad annoying, different information from several websites; from how many to purchase, to food, water and light conditions, the info is all over the board it seems. I don't want any aggressive fish in my tank, just some nice colorful quiet little guys to watch.
We have a fish profiles section, second tab from the left in the blue bar at the top. Many of the more commonly-seen fish are there, more are regularly being added. We provide info on water parameters, companions, behaviour, numbers, minimum tank sizes, suggested foods, etc. It is good advice to always know the fish before acquiring it. Not all fish go together as you probably know, and for many more reaons than behaviour.

On the island your water is likely soft and slightly acideic; when I lived in Victoria it was. Might be different if you are up island. IF this is the case, you have soft acidic water, I would forget livebearers. They will not do well unless you raise the hardness and pH with natural calcareous products like dolomite, marble, coral. But soft acidic water fish will be right at home.

Byron.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:00 AM   #6
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
We have a fish profiles section, second tab from the left in the blue bar at the top. Many of the more commonly-seen fish are there, more are regularly being added. We provide info on water parameters, companions, behaviour, numbers, minimum tank sizes, suggested foods, etc. It is good advice to always know the fish before acquiring it. Not all fish go together as you probably know, and for many more reaons than behaviour.

On the island your water is likely soft and slightly acideic; when I lived in Victoria it was. Might be different if you are up island. IF this is the case, you have soft acidic water, I would forget livebearers. They will not do well unless you raise the hardness and pH with natural calcareous products like dolomite, marble, coral. But soft acidic water fish will be right at home.

Byron.
That sounds nice, adding the dolomite, marble and coral to a tank. Would that work if I wanted to put in live plants too? And, is it hard to maintain the ph and less acidic water after these rocks are added? This is something I hadn't explored at all.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:11 AM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by oceans View Post
That sounds nice, adding the dolomite, marble and coral to a tank. Would that work if I wanted to put in live plants too? And, is it hard to maintain the ph and less acidic water after these rocks are added? This is something I hadn't explored at all.
First we need to know the parameters of the tap water (source water), GH, KH and pH. Raising hardness and pH is considerably simpler than lowering it. When I lived in Victoria I had a tank of livebearers and a tank of rift lake cichlids, and in both I used dolomite gravel. Some plants will grow in this, others not very well. Vallisneria is ideal, it loves hard water because it will readily use bicarbonates as its source of carbon rather than CO2. Mosses cannot grow in hard water.

Rocks do not work so well, they take too long; gravel or crushed rock like dolomite or marble works well. I have had no luck finding dolomite recently, it used to be in every fish store. Crushed coral will also work, though not as effectively because it doesn't have magnesium like dolomite does. Marble chips I have never used myself.

The amount of these varies, but if the intention is to raise the hardness and pH significantly it will take a fair bit. I used dolomite for the substrate and I believe I had a pH around 7.8 with Victoria's tap water than back then was around 6 or even less.

Byron.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:23 AM   #8
 
Thanks for the info. That's something I'll sleep on and talk to hubby about. I'm fading fast though, I'm dead tired, so I'm going to call it a night.

Again, thank you.
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