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Adding water back to the tank ?

This is a discussion on Adding water back to the tank ? within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by Byron Back in the 1980's I used the bucket method, and my largest tank then was a 55g. As someone mentinoed, ...

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Adding water back to the tank ?
Old 02-08-2011, 07:40 PM   #11
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Back in the 1980's I used the bucket method, and my largest tank then was a 55g. As someone mentinoed, the buckets have to be higher than the tank, so I had two stacking tables. Lifting a 3 gallon pail of water high is not that easy, as I think tanker mentioned. Then in the 1990's when I bought my 90g the store sold me a Python. I've never looked back.

And stores here connect directly to the tap, same as I do. As long as you know what is in your water, you can manage fine. After I drained out about half the tank, I adjust the temp at the faucet to closely mjatch the tank and then flick the valve and start filling. I walk back into the fishroom and squirt the conditioner in and leave it to fill. In more than 15 years I've only once had a problem, and that was when I forgot the conditioner in one tank.

Water conditioners work instantly, so there is no danger of chlorine/chloramine using the direct tap fill method if the conditioner is in the tank within a few moments of starting to fill. I've even had fish swimming into the current, and they would never do that if their gills were being burned by chlorine.

CPFAN001, may I ask what adjusting you are doing to the water, aside from conditioner? It may not be necessary, depending upon what it is. And changing more of the tank water may be beneficial, depending upon your situation with fish species. The more water changed, the better for the fish. I do 50-60% weekly.

Byron.
Thanks for the info - what is this python you speak of?

Evidentally my since of touch and temp is not the best... I am usually off by 5 or 7 degrees. My community fish seem to like 77.7 degrees so I am afraid of putting hose to tank with my poor judge of temp. So the cholorine treatment and getting the temp to match is basically what I am doing before I add water.
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Old 02-08-2011, 07:54 PM   #12
 
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The python is a special hose device that you can use to drain and fill your tank.

No Spill Clean & Fill Python Productss

To get the temperature right, you could just pour a bit into a bucket (or the sink) first and use a themometer to test.
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:00 PM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CPFAN001 View Post
Thanks for the info - what is this python you speak of?

Evidentally my since of touch and temp is not the best... I am usually off by 5 or 7 degrees. My community fish seem to like 77.7 degrees so I am afraid of putting hose to tank with my poor judge of temp. So the cholorine treatment and getting the temp to match is basically what I am doing before I add water.
That's OK. I was wondering if you were fiddling with pH and such, which in regular water changes should not be necessary since the tank water should be relatively close to the tap, though there are some exceptions, needn't go into all that.

I have a plastic container, something like what cottage cheese comes in, that I use. I take it full of tank water to the faucet, adjust the hot/cold until it feels the same, or a little cooler, then reverse the flow so the tank fills. Most fish will be invigorated by a sudden slight cooling--it is just like a tropical rainstorm which can lower the water temp several degrees quickly. It is a common way to induce spawning. Point is, a few degrees won't hurt, and cooler rather than warmer in most cases. Very sensitive warm water fish like chocolate gourami are better with equal or slightly warmer water changes.

The "Python" is the trade name of a hose contraption that connects to a faucet. I'm attaching a site with a photo demo.
Aquarium Maintenance & Water Quality: How to Use the Python No Spill Clean 'N Fill

I use the laundry room tub as it has an "outside" type faucet that a hose will attach to. I had no luck with the adapters for the kitchen faucet, the plastic threads kept slipping. There is a valve arrangement on the faucet part that allows you to turn on the tap and the water flow creates a suction that causes the tank to drain; reverse it and the tank fills. Python is one brand, but I have found the Aqueon faucet attachment to be superior in construction. I had to replace this part 3 times with Python, but my Aqueon has lasted.
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:02 PM   #14
 
Ok you gents have convinced me...

So say a prayer, bow to Budah, Alah or whoever and keep my fish in your thoughts this weekend when I do my water change.... "hose to tank" ;)
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:15 PM   #15
 
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Are you going to get a python? If not, and you are just using a garden hose, I bought one new that I use only for the aquarium. The spray gun is also new and only for the aquarium. I'd read on-line to be wary of lead in the hoses (none of the hoses here identified themselves as containing lead, but overseas I gathered some cheaper hoses might have it). If you are using your ordinary hose, just be careful you haven't used any garden products and got them on your fittings.

As Byron said, the fish go under the hose when it's filling. Mine puts out quite a stream and you'd think the fish would run away and hide, but they love sitting under it and getting blasted with the water coming in.
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:36 PM   #16
 
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I agree on the garden hose issue, have to be careful with anything not made for aquaria.

If you can find the Aqueon, I would choose it over the Python brand, simply due to better quality. Ive no idea about price comparisons, so dont ask me that.

Another thing forgot to mention, they come from a standard 25-foot hose, and you can buy additional hoses in 25-foot lengths to reach from the tank to any faucet you need to use. I have 75 feet on mine now.
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Old 02-08-2011, 08:46 PM   #17
 
Thanks I actually use the Python to get the water out of the tank. After I saw the link realized that was the name of what I have. Can absolutely use that when I get the never to go from sink to tank.
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