37 gallon stocking suggestion - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » 37 gallon stocking suggestion

37 gallon stocking suggestion

This is a discussion on 37 gallon stocking suggestion within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by jimmyhoye I think i have a rough idea of what i am going to get. I am going to have some ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Platy
Platy
Badis
Badis
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
37 gallon stocking suggestion
Old 04-10-2009, 05:34 PM   #11
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyhoye View Post
I think i have a rough idea of what i am going to get. I am going to have some dwarf chiclids in the tank. I also want some chocolate gouramis and maybe a school of rasboars. What do you think any othet suggestions
I don't know your level of experience, so pardon me if you already know this. The chocolate gouramis are very sensitive fish, I had some several years ago. They must have soft acidic water and much warmer temperatures (above 80F up to 86F); at cooler temperatures or in less suitable water they are very prone to bacteria and skin parasites (note below). Rasbora would be very good tankmates, especially the rarer Rasbora espei, as would the Croaking gourami (Trichopsis vittatus) and the dwarf or pygmy croaking gourami (Trichopsis pumilus). For bottom dwellers, the horseface loach (Acanthopsis choirorhynchus) is ideal as it is quiet (frequently buries itself in the substrate). Dwarf loaches (Botia sidthimunki) would suit the tank, but might be too active a swimmer for the chocolate gouramis who like things quiet. All of the afore-mentioned would thrive in a tank with soft water, pH 6-6.8, around 82F and with a fine sandy bottom. Plants such as Hygrophila difformis (wisteria) and floating fern (Ceratopteris) are perfect and very easy, plus any of the crypts (Cryptocoryne species) that would thrive in such conditions. The floating plants will shade the tank from the light which also suits the chocolate gouramis.

This was almost the setup I had and it worked well for several years. The chocolate gouramis came down with velvet once, I was told it was because the tank was not warm enough (around 79-80 I think), and that was difficult to cure, but I finally did. They are very prone to disease if not kept in very particular water. Make sure the tank is well aged (several months) before adding them, and regular partial water changes are even more critical.

I wouldn't recommend cichlids in this setup. The dwarf cichlids from South America prefer less warm water than what the gouramis must have, and keeping any fish in warmer water than it is biologically programmed for is not advisable because it weakens the fish's resistance and can lead to disease and death in some cases. Corys and many other catfish cannot stand water this warm; I lost all the corys in one tank when the heater malfunctioned and the temp went up to 85F.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2009, 05:38 PM   #12
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyhoye View Post
Dont siamese algae eaters get to big, and aggresive, and what is yours guy thought on my ideas
YES and they're rather unattractive. With your good taste in gouramis, cichlids and rasboras i doubt that the SAE is for you.
catfishtabbi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2009, 08:28 PM   #13
 
since i am being told basically from what i interpreted the posts as that i would probably want to pick either the chocolate gouramis or dwarf chiclids and not to mix them, but the rasboaras are fine both ways. I would rather have the dwarf chliclids over the gouramis so i am gonnna have them and the rasboras. Would i be able to have pearl gouramis with the rasboras and dwarf cichlids. Also is the horseface loach also know as the kuhli loach. And with a small school of hong kong plecos/hillstream loaches work in this setup.
jimmyhoye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2009, 10:14 PM   #14
 
Yes, Yes Yes. Gouramis and dwarf cichlid and rasboras; i like the pinkish ones, sounds perfect. I'm working toward dwarf gouramis (which i have 6 altogether), rainbows and borelli cichlids myself. I also have small schools of many different tetras and a hilllstream loach and yo-yo loaches... few others. Good luck getting them all ,it will be a nice tank.
catfishtabbi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2009, 09:16 AM   #15
 
thanks frall the help, the tank should be great
jimmyhoye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2009, 05:32 PM   #16
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyhoye View Post
since i am being told basically from what i interpreted the posts as that i would probably want to pick either the chocolate gouramis or dwarf chiclids and not to mix them, but the rasboaras are fine both ways. I would rather have the dwarf chliclids over the gouramis so i am gonnna have them and the rasboras. Would i be able to have pearl gouramis with the rasboras and dwarf cichlids. Also is the horseface loach also know as the kuhli loach. And with a small school of hong kong plecos/hillstream loaches work in this setup.
No, the kuhli loach is very different (always makes me thin of a snake); do a Google search for the horseface loach (Acanthopsis choirorhynchus) and you'll see what it's like. I don't know how the hillstream loaches behave, I have only recently seen them in stores but never kept them, but from catfishtabbi's post I would conclude they are OK in community tanks.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 11:46 AM   #17
 
I looked up the horseface loach but im ont to interested in it. But i do need osme other help. I am planning on using sand as my substrate for this tank and im new to sand substrate, can you guys give me some clues on what sand to use nd how to care for it
jimmyhoye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2009, 12:56 PM   #18
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyhoye View Post
I looked up the horseface loach but im ont to interested in it. But i do need osme other help. I am planning on using sand as my substrate for this tank and im new to sand substrate, can you guys give me some clues on what sand to use nd how to care for it
There is a thread entitled "sand" started on 03-12-2009 in the Aquariumn Plants section of this forum that you might want to read through, as several members offered comments. To save time, I'll copy my last response below.

I quote from Peter Hiscock's book "Encyclopedia of Aquarium Plants" because he says it so well [page 43]. "Sand can cause problems if used as the sole substrate in an aquarium. Over time it will compact, preventing water movement and causing anaerobic conditions, which result in stagnation and the release of toxins. Stirring the sand gently and regularly will prevent this problem, although most plants do not appreciate constant disturbance. ... When using sand, be sure to choose a completely inert form. Many commercial sands contain traces of lime or calcareous materials, although most of the products sold by aquatic retailers are safe."

I'm assuming that you are somewhat familiar with the biological processes in an aquarium termed the nitrogen cycle, by which nitrosomonas bacteria convert ammonia into nitrite, and nitrobacter bacteria convert nitrite into nitrate. This is an aerobic process, which means the bacteria use oxygen to perform these tasks. In the substrate, oxygen also needs to be present, and oxygen is releasd by plant roots. A substrate rich in organic material (waste and nutrient-rich additives) naturally contains large numbers of bacteria that break down these organics into nutrients that the plant roots can use. The oxygen is quickly used up in this process, and the substrate becomes anaerobic; different types of bacteria form which do not need large quantities of oxygen or which create their own. These anaerobic bacteria release toxic gases like hydrogen sulphide. As the bacteria use nitrates, nitrogen is released. As long as the substrate is not too fine and compact the combination of slow-moving current and the release of oxygen by the plant roots should prevent the majority of the substrate from becoming anaerobic. But if the substrate compacts, it will turn anaerobic, causing plant roots to rot and when released into the water cause problems for fish.

Just as with gravel you "stir it up" a bit with the syphon during the weekly water change, so you must with sand, but you can't use the syphon as watts300 said because it sucks up the sand. You can use your fingers to gently work through most of the sand to ensure it is not compacting, being careful not to disturb the plant roots. As I've never used sand myself, I can't say how much disturbance you need to do to ensure a healthy substrate. Others who have sand should be able to advise on that point. There will be pockets of anaerobic conditions in the substrate, whether sand or gravel, but they must never be allowed to expand to the point where they cause pollution as I've tried to explain. It seems to be a bit trickier to ensure a healthy substrate with sand than gravel.

As to type, anything inert will do. Some recommend play sand from Home Depot. Just don't use marine sand as it is intended to raise the pH as you need for saltwater fish, and you don't want that in a freshwater plant tank.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 12:40 PM   #19
 
Alright i am not doing sand because this is in my bedroom and i dont want a huge mess lol. I also had to go with a 30 gallon instead of a 37. What are some good live plants to go in a 30 gallon tank. I will also have rock build up in my tank.
jimmyhoye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2009, 01:31 PM   #20
 
Byron's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyhoye View Post
Alright i am not doing sand because this is in my bedroom and i dont want a huge mess lol. I also had to go with a 30 gallon instead of a 37. What are some good live plants to go in a 30 gallon tank. I will also have rock build up in my tank.
I've read back through this thread, let's see if I've followed it correctly. You're going to stock the tank with gouramis, dwarf cichlids (pair is best) and rasbora. Gravel substrate. Plants.

Now we need some info: what is your tap water pH (assuming tap water will be your tank water source)? Do you have a light for the tank, and is it flourescent, and if yes, how many tubes will it hold? This will determine the type of plants, and there are many I can suggest when we know.
Byron is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
stocking a 75 gallon stephanieleah Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 5 03-08-2010 02:49 AM
Stocking 55 gallon LisaC144 Livebearers 1 11-01-2009 05:34 PM
40 Gallon Stocking kkkkyle7 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 4 02-13-2009 08:43 AM
Stocking my 105-gallon display tank and 20 gallon sump fishr4life Saltwater Fish 2 01-27-2008 02:51 PM
Looking for a stocking suggestion dprUsh83 Freshwater and Tropical Fish 10 12-20-2006 08:30 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:33 AM.