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29 gallon planted nano

This is a discussion on 29 gallon planted nano within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Sounds good. For the back, sometimes it is best to leave it open. Seeing through to the back, esp if black non-shiny like construction ...

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29 gallon planted nano
Old 04-03-2012, 04:36 PM   #21
 
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Sounds good. For the back, sometimes it is best to leave it open. Seeing through to the back, esp if black non-shiny like construction paper, can increase the sense of depth. Also, floating plants are in my view mandatory for forest fish, and Water Sprite with its dangling roots fills in spaces nicely.

When I researched Wisteria for our profile I took the majority opinion on light and it was moderate-bright. From my experience, I would agree. I don't have sufficient light to keep this plant beyond a few months.

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Old 04-03-2012, 10:06 PM   #22
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Sounds good. For the back, sometimes it is best to leave it open. Seeing through to the back, esp if black non-shiny like construction paper, can increase the sense of depth. Also, floating plants are in my view mandatory for forest fish, and Water Sprite with its dangling roots fills in spaces nicely.

When I researched Wisteria for our profile I took the majority opinion on light and it was moderate-bright. From my experience, I would agree. I don't have sufficient light to keep this plant beyond a few months.

Byron.
Perfect. I did forget to mention the Water Sprite. I've long been sold on that and have found it on sale online. I'm liking the lily since in low light it should appear reddish and grow slow. I can trim it to make sure. I'm totally unsure of the size of the wendtii so I may put them more towards the back and have becketii in front. Now I'm just left to figure out the numbers of everything to buy.

When I hear lowlight I automatically (right or wrong) assume low tech. Researching further I'm thinking that was not the case with the list I saw. Seems as if some of those low light plants were grown with CO2. I'm definitely letting go of the idea of stem plants.

Is there a preferred method of cycling when it comes to crypts? Obviously I'd like to avoid crypt melt if I can (not sure if that's possible). I have the new media in my old filter so it's building up bacteria. It's my hope that since I'll be ordering online that I'll be able to order a decent amount of fish at the first go.
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Old 04-04-2012, 11:45 AM   #23
 
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When I hear lowlight I automatically (right or wrong) assume low tech. Researching further I'm thinking that was not the case with the list I saw. Seems as if some of those low light plants were grown with CO2. I'm definitely letting go of the idea of stem plants.
Natural CO2 in a healthy aquarium will usually be sufficient to match lower light intensities. I had a discussion with Tom Barr about this once, and he suggested that in most moderately stocked and planted tanks the CO2 would be sufficient for several hours, and likely begin to wane by mid-afternoon. This is only an estimate of course. I have my lights on for 8-9 hours and so far this seems to be balancing the CO2, all natural. I use algae as the guide, since once the CO2 is exhausted and plants can't photosynthesize, algae will take advantage. But if the light is not intense, even minimal CO2 near the end of the photo period would presumably suffice.

You can add CO2 to a low-light system, but the plants can only photosynthesize if everything is available, up to the point when something is no longer there. If the CO2 continues past that point, it is being wasted, and I see no point in pumping CO2 into a fish tank unnecessarily. It can poison the fish if it increases too far. But in tanks with very low fish numbers, adding CO2 might prove beneficial. But I think most would agree that low light implies no added CO2 in most cases.

Quote:
Is there a preferred method of cycling when it comes to crypts? Obviously I'd like to avoid crypt melt if I can (not sure if that's possible). I have the new media in my old filter so it's building up bacteria. It's my hope that since I'll be ordering online that I'll be able to order a decent amount of fish at the first go.
There is no way to prevent crypt melt except by never disturbing the plants or allowing any changes to the environment (water, light, nutrients, pH, hardness, etc). Some species and even plants are more susceptible than others. I have moved crypts with no melt occurring; but the same crypts have melted within a day when the pH changed suddenly during a water change.

Remember that with live plants, you do not have a discernible cycle. When planted, add some fish and fertilizer and you're on the way.
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Old 04-04-2012, 03:13 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Natural CO2 in a healthy aquarium will usually be sufficient to match lower light intensities. I had a discussion with Tom Barr about this once, and he suggested that in most moderately stocked and planted tanks the CO2 would be sufficient for several hours, and likely begin to wane by mid-afternoon. This is only an estimate of course. I have my lights on for 8-9 hours and so far this seems to be balancing the CO2, all natural. I use algae as the guide, since once the CO2 is exhausted and plants can't photosynthesize, algae will take advantage. But if the light is not intense, even minimal CO2 near the end of the photo period would presumably suffice.

You can add CO2 to a low-light system, but the plants can only photosynthesize if everything is available, up to the point when something is no longer there. If the CO2 continues past that point, it is being wasted, and I see no point in pumping CO2 into a fish tank unnecessarily. It can poison the fish if it increases too far. But in tanks with very low fish numbers, adding CO2 might prove beneficial. But I think most would agree that low light implies no added CO2 in most cases.



There is no way to prevent crypt melt except by never disturbing the plants or allowing any changes to the environment (water, light, nutrients, pH, hardness, etc). Some species and even plants are more susceptible than others. I have moved crypts with no melt occurring; but the same crypts have melted within a day when the pH changed suddenly during a water change.

Remember that with live plants, you do not have a discernible cycle. When planted, add some fish and fertilizer and you're on the way.
Tom Barr is a someone I need to read up on. I have heard mention of him many times before, specifically when it came to going higher light plants in a low light setup with CO2. I didn't think I'd ever be interested in live plants, but the more I study them the more interesting they become. I guess I'm growing as a hobbyist from the kid who had fish tanks but few books and no internet.

Another question if you don't mind, and I apologise for being annoying with all of them. The fixture I'm using is a single T8 that I already owned. I bought the 20W Life-Glo 2 bulb you recommended to go in it. I know this lighting will work. My question though is would I be better served by getting a dual T8 fixture? Would I see any difference in growth if doing that and still not using CO2? Many of the plants I'll be buying will be either bulbs or leafless.
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:08 PM   #25
 
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Originally Posted by blackwaterguy View Post
Tom Barr is a someone I need to read up on. I have heard mention of him many times before, specifically when it came to going higher light plants in a low light setup with CO2. I didn't think I'd ever be interested in live plants, but the more I study them the more interesting they become. I guess I'm growing as a hobbyist from the kid who had fish tanks but few books and no internet.

Another question if you don't mind, and I apologise for being annoying with all of them. The fixture I'm using is a single T8 that I already owned. I bought the 20W Life-Glo 2 bulb you recommended to go in it. I know this lighting will work. My question though is would I be better served by getting a dual T8 fixture? Would I see any difference in growth if doing that and still not using CO2? Many of the plants I'll be buying will be either bulbs or leafless.
Tom is very knowledgeable on plants and such, but his approach is not my approach, we differ on many things, like water changes for one. Everyone has their particular take on planted tanks, but there are many ways to have a successful tank. I highly respect knowledgeable aquarists but I may not always agree with everything they hold; but I use their knowledge and expertise where I can to learn.

This is a 29g with low and moderate light plants. I would not add a second tube. I only have a siingle T8 tube, 24 inch, 20w over my 29g and it is doing very well. Doubling that would mean algae for sure, as the CO2 and nutrients could not balance.

Last edited by Byron; 04-04-2012 at 04:10 PM..
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:31 PM   #26
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Tom is very knowledgeable on plants and such, but his approach is not my approach, we differ on many things, like water changes for one. Everyone has their particular take on planted tanks, but there are many ways to have a successful tank. I highly respect knowledgeable aquarists but I may not always agree with everything they hold; but I use their knowledge and expertise where I can to learn.

This is a 29g with low and moderate light plants. I would not add a second tube. I only have a siingle T8 tube, 24 inch, 20w over my 29g and it is doing very well. Doubling that would mean algae for sure, as the CO2 and nutrients could not balance.
Thank you once more. Lighting is still confusing to me, even after reading your articles and others. I know the watts per gallon rule is outdated. To be honest I'm not even sure if that rule applied to T12 or T8 as well. I thought the dual lighting would still have me in low lght, closer to moderate. Saving money is always good though. I will be fertilisizing. I have Flourish comprehensive now, but will be getting root tabs as well since I have many root feeders planned.
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Old 04-04-2012, 06:00 PM   #27
 
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Thank you once more. Lighting is still confusing to me, even after reading your articles and others. I know the watts per gallon rule is outdated. To be honest I'm not even sure if that rule applied to T12 or T8 as well. I thought the dual lighting would still have me in low lght, closer to moderate. Saving money is always good though. I will be fertilisizing. I have Flourish comprehensive now, but will be getting root tabs as well since I have many root feeders planned.
The watts per gallon "guide" worked reasonably well when all we had were T12 (now T8) tubes in a basic spectrum, and over "average" sized tanks. [Though I never agreed with the numbers (2+ watts per gallon) and my tanks back in the 1980's were all below 1 wpg.] It never worked for small tanks (5, 10, 15, 20 gallon) or very large tanks. But today we have so many more energy-efficient types that produce more and more light with less energy--thus less wattage, because watts is only the measurement of energy used by a tube regardless of the light intensity. We have to consider the intensity and the spectrum.

The single T8 in a decent spectrum as you now have puts you in low to moderate, although these designations are debatable in themselves. My guide is always the fish; the less light the better, so start with the minimal light for the plants. And it is also less expense long-term, as less electricity is being used.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:21 AM   #28
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Now that I know my lighting is great I'm going to do some shopping online tomorrow. That should help prevent me from changing my mind again since I already found a hobbyist with C. willisii, lucens, and petchii for sale. The Aponogenton undulatus he has though is a tempting replacement for the Cryptocoryne retrospiralis I had been thinking. Fine they are all tempting and easy, but if I went that route I'd probably have a horrible aquascape.

Byron, I reread your profile for the Aponogenton cripus and you recommend them in a grouping. Would three be an ok number for a tank my size? I had originally been thinking one until I reread.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:04 PM   #29
 
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Now that I know my lighting is great I'm going to do some shopping online tomorrow. That should help prevent me from changing my mind again since I already found a hobbyist with C. willisii, lucens, and petchii for sale. The Aponogenton undulatus he has though is a tempting replacement for the Cryptocoryne retrospiralis I had been thinking. Fine they are all tempting and easy, but if I went that route I'd probably have a horrible aquascape.

Byron, I reread your profile for the Aponogenton cripus and you recommend them in a grouping. Would three be an ok number for a tank my size? I had originally been thinking one until I reread.
In a 29g I would go with one Aponogeton crispus.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:43 PM   #30
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In a 29g I would go with one Aponogeton crispus.
Thank you. I'm going to assume the same would be true for the Aponogeton undulatus. Waiting on pics, but I'm thinking the plan is to order one each of the Aponogetons and the lily. Two java ferns. Three each of Cryptocoryne lucens, undulata, wendtii brown and wendtii green. Only thing I'm looking for yet is water sprite.
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