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29 gallon planted nano

This is a discussion on 29 gallon planted nano within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Originally Posted by blackwaterguy I'm working on a list of lowlight plants from the region right now just to see what my options are. ...

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29 gallon planted nano
Old 02-22-2012, 12:05 PM   #11
 
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Originally Posted by blackwaterguy View Post
I'm working on a list of lowlight plants from the region right now just to see what my options are. I have to do further research but right now this is my list:Cryptocoryne affinis, Cryptocoryne aponogetifolia, Cryptocoryne balansae, Cryptcoryne becketii, Cryptocoryne lutea, Cryptocoryne petchii, Cryptocoryne pygmaea, Cryptocoryne retrospiralis, Cryptocoryne spiralis, Cryptocoryne walkeri, Cryptocoryne wendtii, Cryptocoryne willisi, Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia, Cryptocoryne undulata, Java Fern, Java Moss, Watersprite, Rotala indica, Rotala rotundifolia, Rotala rotundifolia sp. 'Green', and Aponogeton crispus. Would a 20W Life-Glo T8 be sufficient to grow any of these? Or will I need a better lighting system for a 29 gallon? I have read the stickies here, but lighting still confuses me a little.
I would say this should work. I've not grown Rotala myself, but it is reported as a moderate light plant and other moderate light plants do fine in my 29g with this tube.
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Old 03-14-2012, 09:18 PM   #12
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How many plants is too many? I have no clue when it comes to aquascaping with plants so I stole a design layout that was being sold and changed it for lowlight (can post it if anyone cares)...long story short is I have 11 plant species for a 29 gallon.
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Old 03-15-2012, 12:34 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by blackwaterguy View Post
How many plants is too many? I have no clue when it comes to aquascaping with plants so I stole a design layout that was being sold and changed it for lowlight (can post it if anyone cares)...long story short is I have 11 plant species for a 29 gallon.
This is difficult to answer. In tanks where you want to create a swamp or flooded forest aquascape, more plants is ideal. In tanks where there are fish that are active swimmers, some open spaces is necessary. It also depends upon the plant species. Not all plants will grow together; some plants release chemicals that "attack" other species, what is called alleopathy. I have very little experience in this area, though I do know some plants never seem to do well together--and before you ask which, I honestly can't remember.
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Old 03-15-2012, 02:51 PM   #14
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This is difficult to answer. In tanks where you want to create a swamp or flooded forest aquascape, more plants is ideal. In tanks where there are fish that are active swimmers, some open spaces is necessary. It also depends upon the plant species. Not all plants will grow together; some plants release chemicals that "attack" other species, what is called alleopathy. I have very little experience in this area, though I do know some plants never seem to do well together--and before you ask which, I honestly can't remember.
I'm shooting for a flooded forest/lagoon. I thought it would both look nice and work well since I'm planning fish that are said to be more shy. The reason I had asked was that I had e-mailed a very good pet store about which plants they had, and was told my list sounded like a lot but could work. That just made me wonder. I have heard some about alleopathy, but like you can't remember which species. Mostly what I had heard was that with normal PWCs it wasn't ever a problem.

I think I've gotten more anxious about my ability to aquascape than I am about my ability to keep the plants alive, since I don't have any fear of that after plenty of research on here. I think I may just give the plan a go. If you're curious it'll look like this. Picture from freshwateraquariumplants.com



My changes:
V30- Cryptocoryne spiralis
R30- Rotala indica
H40- Cryptocoryne lucens
C321- Cryptocoryne willisi
H170- Cryptocoryne balansae
M40- Microsorium pteropus
B40- Aponogeton crispus
R10- Rotala rotundifolia
C421- Cryptocoryne wendtii bronze
C406- Cryptocoryne wendtii green
Not pictured and floating- Ceratopteris thalictroides
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Old 03-15-2012, 03:22 PM   #15
 
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The Aponogeton crispus front and centre will (should) get tallish, so you may want to reposition that more off to a side.

Something I forgot previously when commenting on too many plants, is that fewer species in an aquarium will look more natural. In natural habitats with very few exceptions, one generally finds no more than 1, 2 or maybe 3 main species in a stream. Having several crypt species is a bit different, though again this would never occur in nature. But then we do want a bit of "show" in a planted aquarium, so the degree to which the aquarist adheres to "natural" can vary a lot, from replicate to stylized replication.

And many of the substrate-rooted plants will naturally spread via runners. For example, all those crypts will spread, slowly generally speaking with crypts, but they will if they are left alone. When I reset my 90g last April as a river habitat, I stuck maybe 5 Cryptocoryne undulata [I think this is the species, never sure with some crypts] along the right front half, and a few Corkscrew Vallisneria on the left side. The latter spread fairly rapidly of course, even for my very soft water, and this month I decided it was time to thin it out, as it had by now, a year later, spread right across the front of the tank and was thickly intertwined with the crypts. So a couple week ago I pulled up all the Vallisneria. I was amazed to find no less than 15 crypts, and all a decent size. The original plants had sent out runners though I had not really noticed due to the thick Vallisneria coverage.
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Old 03-15-2012, 04:16 PM   #16
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The Aponogeton crispus front and centre will (should) get tallish, so you may want to reposition that more off to a side.

Something I forgot previously when commenting on too many plants, is that fewer species in an aquarium will look more natural. In natural habitats with very few exceptions, one generally finds no more than 1, 2 or maybe 3 main species in a stream. Having several crypt species is a bit different, though again this would never occur in nature. But then we do want a bit of "show" in a planted aquarium, so the degree to which the aquarist adheres to "natural" can vary a lot, from replicate to stylized replication.

And many of the substrate-rooted plants will naturally spread via runners. For example, all those crypts will spread, slowly generally speaking with crypts, but they will if they are left alone. When I reset my 90g last April as a river habitat, I stuck maybe 5 Cryptocoryne undulata [I think this is the species, never sure with some crypts] along the right front half, and a few Corkscrew Vallisneria on the left side. The latter spread fairly rapidly of course, even for my very soft water, and this month I decided it was time to thin it out, as it had by now, a year later, spread right across the front of the tank and was thickly intertwined with the crypts. So a couple week ago I pulled up all the Vallisneria. I was amazed to find no less than 15 crypts, and all a decent size. The original plants had sent out runners though I had not really noticed due to the thick Vallisneria coverage.
I'm not very fond of where the Aponogeton crispus is in that picture. I had been thinking slightly to the left and behind the curved piece of driftwood I had. My hope was that it would serve as a good focal point if I placed it at a third of the tank's length. Or do you believe that would still be out of place?


I suppose I'm trying for stylized natural, unless by that you mean Amano. I was pretty excited at having a blueprint, but some simplification could be in order. You have me sold on the waterspirte so I'd like to keep that. I'm unsure if the spiralis and balanasae would be a bad idea with the watersprite as they would grow along the surface. Think that would be a mess? If not I could also lose the Rotala rotundifolia. In that case I could have the balansae and spiralis on either side of the back with the Rotala indica in between for some contrast. I could also just jumble up the smaller crypts randomly or get rid of some.

As for the runners...well this is me speaking right now, but I'd be ecstatic to have that problem. Ask me in a year though and my feelings might have changed lol.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:04 PM   #17
 
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I'm not very fond of where the Aponogeton crispus is in that picture. I had been thinking slightly to the left and behind the curved piece of driftwood I had. My hope was that it would serve as a good focal point if I placed it at a third of the tank's length. Or do you believe that would still be out of place?
I was just observing that it will get tall (or should). You can always move it afterwards.

Quote:
I suppose I'm trying for stylized natural, unless by that you mean Amano. I was pretty excited at having a blueprint, but some simplification could be in order. You have me sold on the waterspirte so I'd like to keep that. I'm unsure if the spiralis and balanasae would be a bad idea with the watersprite as they would grow along the surface. Think that would be a mess? If not I could also lose the Rotala rotundifolia. In that case I could have the balansae and spiralis on either side of the back with the Rotala indica in between for some contrast. I could also just jumble up the smaller crypts randomly or get rid of some.
I was only making observations, in response to your post about too many plants. And by stylized nature, I was trying to find a phrase for an aquascape based on a geographical area but not a true biotope. My tanks are all like this, my Amazonian have all fish and plants from the Amazon, but no where would you ever find this combination. A true biotope would be true to a particular stream or river, or some specific region. And in these you would never find so many plants and fish species.

I don't have particularly good luck with crypts. The runners mentioned earlier are quite a surprise to me. But that is a fairly hardy crypt, and once planted i did leave it alone, which is what crypts like.
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Old 04-02-2012, 11:52 PM   #18
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I've spent a few weeks now constantly looking up plants and pretty much driving myself nuts. On the plus side I think I might actually be able to start IDing some of the ones I'm constantly looking up. I'm definitely opening up to plants from other regions I just would like to try and simplify a bit at least. In that vain, and hoping to finally finalise the idea in my head I have some questions I hope someone on here might be willing to answer.

My only hardscape right now is a 6 inch curved, almost U-shaped, piece of driftwood. I should probably get more but as of right now that's it. I'm hoping to make it a centerpoint even though it is low to the ground.

Now for my questions.

1. I really like the Apogenton crispus and don't mind if it grows along the top. Would it be best placed in one of the back corners?

2.If I'm not using the crispus as a centerpiece are there any suggestions for something I can? For instance a lowlight sword that won't grow to big (yeah not asking for much there am I?) or perhaps a small lily, etc.

3.Would a group of one or two bunched plants like Rotala indica or Wisteria look out of place amongst a variety of crypts?

4.Speaking of the crypts would they look best in seperate groups or mixed together? By that I mean both varieties (wendtii green, bronze, red, whatever else I could find that isn't Florida sunset) and similar sized species (undulata, wendtii, ponterderiifolia, etc).

I think with some answers there I might finally be able to come up with a plan to run by everyone.
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Old 04-03-2012, 12:40 PM   #19
 
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1. I really like the Apogenton crispus and don't mind if it grows along the top. Would it be best placed in one of the back corners?
I would say close to a back corner.

Quote:
2.If I'm not using the crispus as a centerpiece are there any suggestions for something I can? For instance a lowlight sword that won't grow to big (yeah not asking for much there am I?) or perhaps a small lily, etc.
In small tanks (like a 29g) I tend to avoid any largish plants as it immediately encloses the space making it seem even smaller. My suggestion would be to make the wood the centrepiece (though not centred in the tank obviously) and plant around it.

Quote:
3.Would a group of one or two bunched plants like Rotala indica or Wisteria look out of place amongst a variety of crypts?
Wisteria is higher light. Most stem plants are, and they are fast growing which can sometimes be more problematic in smallish tanks.

Quote:
4.Speaking of the crypts would they look best in seperate groups or mixed together? By that I mean both varieties (wendtii green, bronze, red, whatever else I could find that isn't Florida sunset) and similar sized species (undulata, wendtii, ponterderiifolia, etc).
These are definitely grouping plants. They will look more "natural" in groups of the same species, but you can mix the species but still having 3 or so plants of each species. As mentioned previously in this thread, as they settle they will send out runners and form a natural clump as they do in nature.
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Old 04-03-2012, 04:32 PM   #20
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Thank you very much Bryon :D

Here's my almost complete plan. I'm going to have the driftwood at the golden ratio (1:1.62 I think) with the open end of the U facing the front of the tank. On the driftwood I will have Windelov java fern. Inside the framing of the driftwood I think I will put either a Echinodorus sword 'tropica' or a Nymphaea stelleta, since I think both stay small. If it's the lily I will train it not to grow to the surface.
On the short side (right of the driftwood I'll have C. undulata with a v-shaped grouping of C. retrospiralis behind it.
On the longer side of the tank (left of the driftwood) I'll have the cripus towards the back corner. In the midground I will have C. wendtii bronze and green since I think the red might grow to large. If I am still in need of a foreground plant (no idea if I am) then it will be C. petchii.

The center back is where I could still use suggestions. My thought was stem plants, since I could keep them trimmed lower than what I had to either side and hopefully create the look of dpeth. I had seen Wisteria listed on a plant forum as low light (no mention of how it looked in those conditions though ;) ). Perhpas something else though? The Rotala indica or maybe Egeria najas? Is there something else I could use to create a concave shape besides a stem plant? Everything I can think of would grow as high, but couldn't be trimmed except but cutting off the whole leaf.

Perhaps it's still too many species but at least it's better. Any thoughts from anyone?
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