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20 gallon tank..

This is a discussion on 20 gallon tank.. within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> If you haven't gotten your tank yet. Do yourself a favor and get a 55 gallon set up. I got a 55. But I ...

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Old 05-13-2013, 09:54 AM   #11
 
If you haven't gotten your tank yet. Do yourself a favor and get a 55 gallon set up. I got a 55. But I decided to set up a smaller tank to begin with, so I got 29 gallon setup to start with, but it's just too small.

I'll be setting up my 55 as soon as school gets out.

Good luck with your tank and have fun. Keeping tropical fish is a great hobby.
Carl
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Old 05-13-2013, 10:58 AM   #12
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
With corys, sand is best substrate.

You still have not told us the GH and pH of your tap water.
I'm not sure of my water parameter but I will add the pH supplements to rise or lower the level of water. I just want a variety of fishes compatible with eachother.

Thanks.
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Old 05-13-2013, 11:19 AM   #13
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suparno View Post
I'm not sure of my water parameter but I will add the pH supplements to rise or lower the level of water. I just want a variety of fishes compatible with eachother.

Thanks.
NO. This can be very dangerous for fish. The pH is of slightly less importance than the GH, and the GH and especially KH will affect the pH. Adding chemicals to adjust the pH usually fails, and causes considerable stress to fish.

You can read about the relationship here:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...quarium-73276/

You need to know your GH and KH of the tap water. These will not change much if at all in the aquarium, and GH affects fish.

Byron.
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Old 05-13-2013, 12:20 PM   #14
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suparno View Post
So you're saying that I should keep the following species in a 20 gallon tank:

8x Cardinal Tetra
6x Dwarf Cory's
6x Cherry Shrimp's
1x Honey Gourami

Even though supported by a decent filter and an air pump, isn't that a bit overstocked?

I'm still quite confused on what substrate to choose from factors such as live plants.

Thanks.

Dwarf Corys may be a bit difficult to find depending on the stores near you, so I wouldn't have that as a 'concrete' stocking option. I also thought you were doing Neons, not cardinals? Just curious.

In regards to stocking, you can get away with a bit 'heavier' stocking if you have a well planted tank, as they help keep the water more stable for the fish. And most of the fish you've chosen are quite small, so there's that, too.

With plants, you don't need an 'enriched' substrate, which is what I think may be causing your confusion. I personally have Flourite Black sand (an 'enriched' substrate) in 2 tanks and regular old rinsed Quikcrete playsand in my third, and I haven't noticed much of a difference with plant growth. I personally love black sand (Flourite Black Sand and Tahitian Moon Sand come to mind) as they make the fish colors 'pop' and the fish can be more comfortable over darker sand, but it is personal preference.
You can use playsand (the safest option is Quikcrete Playsand) or 'aquarium' sand. Carib-Sea sells several different colors of sand, at around $20 per 20lb bag.
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Old 05-13-2013, 12:30 PM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by jentralala View Post
Dwarf Corys may be a bit difficult to find depending on the stores near you, so I wouldn't have that as a 'concrete' stocking option. I also thought you were doing Neons, not cardinals? Just curious.

In regards to stocking, you can get away with a bit 'heavier' stocking if you have a well planted tank, as they help keep the water more stable for the fish. And most of the fish you've chosen are quite small, so there's that, too.

With plants, you don't need an 'enriched' substrate, which is what I think may be causing your confusion. I personally have Flourite Black sand (an 'enriched' substrate) in 2 tanks and regular old rinsed Quikcrete playsand in my third, and I haven't noticed much of a difference with plant growth. I personally love black sand (Flourite Black Sand and Tahitian Moon Sand come to mind) as they make the fish colors 'pop' and the fish can be more comfortable over darker sand, but it is personal preference.
You can use playsand (the safest option is Quikcrete Playsand) or 'aquarium' sand. Carib-Sea sells several different colors of sand, at around $20 per 20lb bag.
Can you please help me with stocking and the reason I chose Cardinals because apparently there are more hardy than Neons. Anyways, I'm completely new, I've ordered my tank and I'm planning to heavily plant it aswell. If not the Corydoras, any other suggestions?

Thanks.
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Old 05-13-2013, 12:39 PM   #16
 
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If you can look up the ph, gh, and kh of your water it would be very helpful for looking at stocking options :) If you live in a city, you can usually just find the water information on your cities website, or google to find who supplies your cities water and look on their webpage for that information. If it's not clearly stated, you can link the page here and one of us can take a look at it and decipher the parameters of your water :)

Did you order a 20 gallon kit? Or just a basic empty tank? I'm asking because we may have to look at altering your lights, as most kits come with lights incompatible for plants, but that's okay! They can always be modified or swapped :)

I'm sorry if this seems really confusing, it's a lot to take in at first, I know! But once we have your tap waters parameters we can go from there :)

Fish have different preferences for water, and depending on the hardness of your water alters what fish will thrive and live long happy lives in your tank.

Just as an aside, while you're obtaining the supplies you need for your tank (heater, filter, etc) don't forget to get a testing kit :) API Liquid Master Test kit is what many of us use here, and it's only about $20 on amazon, and it will last for a very long time and is very helpful to successfully keeping fish :)
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Old 05-13-2013, 12:59 PM   #17
 
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Byron makes a really good point about knowing what your Kh and Gh is before you stock, and you'll find that many members here will be a bit leery of offering suggestions without knowing this basic information. It's easier, cheaper - and safer for the animals to to stock your tank based on the water that you already have coming out of your faucet than to try doing things the other way around. Even if you then choose to make adjustments to it, you'll at least have a starting point, and we can discuss the best way to go from there.

Chemicals like 'ph up' and 'ph down' often just drop the ph for about a day, and then it rockets back up/down to where it was (due to gh and kh), and this rapid change adversely affects fish, and can even kill them.

Many members alter their water by a more natural means (which can take a lot of effort), but your water may be perfect as is for the fish you intend to keep. Even if it isn't, there are many different species of fish, and some of the ones we may suggest for your water, you could fall in love with! It's all a mystery until we know the numbers :)

If you absolutely can't find the info online (you may even be able to call your cities water supplier), API does have a liquid test kit for gh/kh, and their liquid master test kit comes with a ph test. Please don't use 'test strips' as many of our members are leery about the results they have being inaccurate :)
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Old 05-13-2013, 03:35 PM   #18
 
Not having any luck with finding details about my water supply. I'll call them up tomorrow and if still left unanswered I guess I have to conduct a test.

Last edited by Suparno; 05-13-2013 at 03:39 PM..
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:31 AM   #19
 
Just called my water supplier and they said that the pH can vary from 6.5 to 9.5 depending on which area and time which isn't what I wanted. I guess I have to test my water tap using liquid as I've just come to know that strips aren't exactly accurate.

Thanks.
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Old 05-17-2013, 03:40 PM   #20
 
Just popped in a shop to purchase API Test Kit and apparently they don't sell API Test Kit as they're inaccurate. I'm not completely convinced but they also said that it doesn't matter what pH level it is as long as it's in a range of 6.5-8. They said that the change of pH is what matters the most as it stresses the fish out. So a few questions here. What effect will adding driftwood or rocks have on the pH? Should I be too concerned about my pH level as long as it's in a range of 6.5-7.5?
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