20 g tall stocking question - Page 2 - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #11 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by xfatdannx View Post
if i went 6 BPT 3 Corys and 6 Cardinals, do you think that would be a little much on the bio load?
I think you could do that and 2-3 more Corys.

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post #12 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 07:02 PM
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I agree with FM, corys do better in slightly larger groups.

Just add the tetras in two separate groups at least two weeks apart, longer the better, and wait the same before adding the corys. This lets your tank stabilize between each additions to the new load and let's your plants catch up. You will have cycling symptoms if you add to many too quickly and the corys can be the most sensitive which is why they ought to be last.

This will be a well loaded tank when you are done.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #13 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 07:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfatdannx View Post
if i went 6 BPT 3 Corys and 6 Cardinals, do you think that would be a little much on the bio load?
I already answered this, a couple posts back. You would be fine with 7-9 cardinals, and 5-6 corys, plus the existing 6 phantom. Live plants. And regular partial water changes weekly. The named species need more in the group.

"Stocking" has to take into account many factors, not just fish size. If a particular species is better in a group, then a slightly larger group means the fish will be less stressed, and this has less of an impact on the biology, than fewer fish that are stressed. It also depends upon the species--their behaviours, size, etc. Active swimming fish mean fewer in a smaller tank than quiet sedate fish in the same sized tank, even though the fish themselves might be the same adult size. This is why I said the Emperor was not as suitable, it is too active.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #14 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 07:33 PM Thread Starter
i must have misunderstood on your previous post then Byron, my apologies. I did not think you said all 3 would be okay. I thought you were saying 2 of the 3 species.

What defines a "Well planted tank" ? I have a few slow and a few fast growers. But how do i know its enough?
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post #15 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 07:41 PM
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Add more plants each time you add fish. Get some floating plants in there too. Even getting some fast growing stem plants that you can temporarily add would help if you have slower stuff. This is a case where overdoing it is a good thing.

I added a mess of duckweed when I added my last batch of fish as I'd absolutely did not want an issue with nitrite spiking as I was away for two weeks right after adding them. My daughter was looking after things and tested every day but it was fine.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #16 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 07:43 PM
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Yes, activity level and surface area are important factors to consider when stocking a tank. Inch of fish per gallon is a nice safe measure insofar as bioload is concerned. Typically, the minimum tank size takes into account habits and respiration needs. Mixing habits is usually not a good idea even if the tank allows for it in sheer size. Busy with busy and sedate with sedate most often creates a more tranquil environment for the fish and the keeper.

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Last edited by fish monger; 04-29-2013 at 07:50 PM.
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post #17 of 25 Old 04-29-2013, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfatdannx View Post
i must have misunderstood on your previous post then Byron, my apologies. I did not think you said all 3 would be okay. I thought you were saying 2 of the 3 species.

What defines a "Well planted tank" ? I have a few slow and a few fast growers. But how do i know its enough?
Fast growing plants are the beneficial ones when it comes to taking up nutrients including ammonia/ammonium. Stem plants are fast growing, but some of these need more light so it does not always work. One sure-fire fast growing plant are the floaters. Floating plants can take up vast amounts of nutrients and ammonia because they are close to the light and light is therefore sufficient, plus being at the surface their leaves can assimilate CO2 from the air which is 4 times faster than from water. So CO2 which is often the nutrient in least supply in the water is readily available.

Good floating plants are Water Sprite, Salvinia, Dwarf Water Lettuce, Frogbit, and of course Duckweed. Some of these are in our profiles (click shaded names). Some stem plants grow nice floating, Brazilian Pennywort is one, and there is Hornwort, Wisteria and Cabomba. Sometimes the latter three will not do as well.

Substrate-rooted plants can be low light, as the floaters shade them somewhat. And being low light, they are naturally slower growing. Swords are an exception though; they manage in moderate light and are fairly fast growing plants. The pygmy chain sword and chain sword are ideal in any tank due to their small size.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #18 of 25 Old 04-30-2013, 02:04 AM Thread Starter
I currently have 2 different crypts, wisteria, anubias (longer skinny leaf)((congensis i believe)), and h. sperma ((picture to the left in my aquarium log))

i had wanted to get water lettuce ever since i heard of it. That will probably be the surface plant i go with. I also wanted some jungle val, supposedly someone was sending me some two weeks ago but i have not heard from them since...

If and when you place orders for plants on line do you guys have any recommendations?

Last edited by xfatdannx; 04-30-2013 at 02:06 AM.
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post #19 of 25 Old 04-30-2013, 04:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xfatdannx View Post
I currently have 2 different crypts, wisteria, anubias (longer skinny leaf)((congensis i believe)), and h. sperma ((picture to the left in my aquarium log))

i had wanted to get water lettuce ever since i heard of it. That will probably be the surface plant i go with. I also wanted some jungle val, supposedly someone was sending me some two weeks ago but i have not heard from them since...

If and when you place orders for plants on line do you guys have any recommendations?
The H. Sperma is a fast grower, I used that and have since removed it from my tank in favour of more leafy plants, crypts mainly. It will do a great job of using up the ammonia. I have always picked up plants at the LFS, can't help with that.

Jeff.


Total years fish keeping experience: 7 months, can't start counting in years for a while yet.

The shotgun approach to a planted tank with an LED fixture

Small scale nitrogen cycle with a jar, water and fish food; no substrate, filter etc
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post #20 of 25 Old 04-30-2013, 06:45 AM
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Aquariumplants,com has been a good source for me. They have a great selection and they do a great job of packaging the plants for safe shipping. Their prices are hard to beat also.

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