2 Part question, moving and Temp
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2 Part question, moving and Temp

This is a discussion on 2 Part question, moving and Temp within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> ok so the more important part. its starting to heat up where i am, my tank is on the 2nd floor and my room ...

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2 Part question, moving and Temp
Old 04-24-2011, 01:36 AM   #1
 
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2 Part question, moving and Temp

ok so the more important part.

its starting to heat up where i am, my tank is on the 2nd floor and my room gets pretty toasty (sometimes even with the AC on)

i got home and my tank was 86 degrees!

what is the best way to bring that temp down? its normally between 78-82 but i had a guppy and 3 platies all clamped finned and hoverin in a top corner (i assume its the heat my water parameters are good)

my second question is this.

i sold my house. i have to move in the next 3-4 weeks in with a friend till i can move into my new place in july. so in the next couple months i will be moving my 55g twice. whats the best way to move the fish?

should i keep some of the water and try and take that with me? im only moving 10-15 minutes away.

Thanks!
-=pat=-
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Old 05-01-2011, 12:23 AM   #2
 
Cooling the tank / Moving

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Originally Posted by patadams66 View Post
ok so the more important part.

its starting to heat up where i am, my tank is on the 2nd floor and my room gets pretty toasty (sometimes even with the AC on)

i got home and my tank was 86 degrees!

what is the best way to bring that temp down? its normally between 78-82 but i had a guppy and 3 platies all clamped finned and hoverin in a top corner (i assume its the heat my water parameters are good)

my second question is this.

i sold my house. i have to move in the next 3-4 weeks in with a friend till i can move into my new place in july. so in the next couple months i will be moving my 55g twice. whats the best way to move the fish?

should i keep some of the water and try and take that with me? im only moving 10-15 minutes away.

Thanks!
-=pat=-
The best way I know how to cool a tank in the heat is to take a well sealing sandwich bag and put a couple of ice cubes in it then put it in the tank, in your case you may need 2-3. As for moving, yes try to keep as much water as you can and hold on to your used filter media keeping it wet, this will help with the new water added. (Just like doing a water change.)
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Old 05-01-2011, 03:07 AM   #3
 
I've use the ice cube method, but I doubt its the proper way to cool down a tank. Especially long term.....

As far as moving. Keeping old water does nothing. You need to bag the fish, drain tank and yada yada... For a 55 gallon the substrate is going to have to be removed to make the tank move-able. I would clean it best you can, unless you have a UGF. Other then that you need to move the mature media and keep it wet and fed during the move. This shouldn't be a problem since your moving only a short distance. I would set the tank up at the new place add new water, dechlor, let it sit empty with filter and heater for an hour maybe to give at least a little time for things to equalize. Then you can add fish, but acclimate them like you would any new fish, by adding small amounts of the new water to the bags and letting them adjust slowly before releasing them. Given this shock on both the fish and the tank I would feed very minimally the first few days so you don't risk a minicycle.

Something else you can do is start fishless cycling a 10 gallon plastic bin. Just keep doing the fishless cycle as long as you can. This will give you a source of mature media to use if something goes wrong and a water quality issue arises.

That said depending how long you are at your friends you could just buy a 50 gallon plastic storage bin and throw the fish in there with light, plants, and filter. Leave the actual tank empty till you get to new house. Saves you the effort of the second tear down.
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Old 05-01-2011, 06:49 AM   #4
 
Yeah, always drain the water when you move the bath tub! Dirty water serves no purpose in a new setup, but Mikaila31 is right, you want to keep the gravel and filter wet to preserve as much beneficial bacteria as possible. As suggested, you want to clean the gravel.
Also, the suggestion of using an interim plastic storage bin is a good one and depending on stock, you might even get away with an 18g bin? (not sure how much 'stock' and how long between moves).

As far as the heat, maybe your next places of residence may be cooler. Short of a chiller, there are a couple of things that come to mind, but they're just off the top of my head as I haven't had to deal with this issue. I'm not sure that ice would be effective, unless you're there to keep adding some throughout the day since say a quart bag of ice would likely be all melted in 3-4 hours. You also want to avoid high/low fluctuations.
If your lights emit heat, leave them off. Perhaps opening the lids and positioning a fan to blow across the top of the water may help?
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Old 05-01-2011, 08:15 PM   #5
 
2 part question

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Originally Posted by AbbeysDad View Post
Yeah, always drain the water when you move the bath tub! Dirty water serves no purpose in a new setup, but Mikaila31 is right, you want to keep the gravel and filter wet to preserve as much beneficial bacteria as possible. As suggested, you want to clean the gravel.
Also, the suggestion of using an interim plastic storage bin is a good one and depending on stock, you might even get away with an 18g bin? (not sure how much 'stock' and how long between moves).

As far as the heat, maybe your next places of residence may be cooler. Short of a chiller, there are a couple of things that come to mind, but they're just off the top of my head as I haven't had to deal with this issue. I'm not sure that ice would be effective, unless you're there to keep adding some throughout the day since say a quart bag of ice would likely be all melted in 3-4 hours. You also want to avoid high/low fluctuations.
If your lights emit heat, leave them off. Perhaps opening the lids and positioning a fan to blow across the top of the water may help?
Maybe you should do a little checking Mikaila31 and AbbeysDad. On a SHORT move, the best way to do it is to save some of the old water to try and preserve some of the bacteria colony and take your used filter media uncleaned and put it in a new or non-chem. used container for transport. Also, make sure where ever your moving to, have enough treated ( dechlorinated ) water to fill your tank so you can get the water flowing through your filter. I've done it this way twice and it worked out fine.
As for the cooling method I suggested, you only need to cool the tank during the hottest part of the day or just a few hours. I was suggested this way 20 years ago by 2 avid aquarium enthusiasts whom also opened their own store.
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Old 05-01-2011, 09:40 PM   #6
Rip
 
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i live in phoenix, az and i've also been getting warmer water in my 55 gallon in the living room. it sits in front of a window on the west side of the house. last week i noticed the temp had gotten up to 81, so i started filling up plastic bottles about two thirds full of water, and freezing them. and then let them float in the tank, and cool the water. i have 3 flavored water bottles and one gallon milk jug that i have in rotation. although after using them all once or twice for the first few days, now the temp has been staying around 78, and i'm only using one or two bottles a day to keep it cool.

it hasn't even reached 100 here yet this year, i wonder how my tank temps will be when it's 115. the tanks in the back bedrooms stay around 75. in march i took all the heaters out of my tanks, except for the betta tank. my 10 gallon gets as cold as 73. i keep the thermostat set at 78.

also i forgot to mention how i have tinfoil taped to the window glass, and mini blinds up on the window that the 55 gallon sits in front of. so no light even comes through.

Last edited by Rip; 05-01-2011 at 09:45 PM..
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Old 05-01-2011, 10:13 PM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by Bigguy71 View Post
Maybe you should do a little checking Mikaila31 and AbbeysDad. On a SHORT move, the best way to do it is to save some of the old water to try and preserve some of the bacteria colony and take your used filter media uncleaned and put it in a new or non-chem. used container for transport. Also, make sure where ever your moving to, have enough treated ( dechlorinated ) water to fill your tank so you can get the water flowing through your filter. I've done it this way twice and it worked out fine.
As for the cooling method I suggested, you only need to cool the tank during the hottest part of the day or just a few hours. I was suggested this way 20 years ago by 2 avid aquarium enthusiasts whom also opened their own store.
There is very little beneficial bacteria in old water so there is no need to "try to keep as much water as you can" as in your original post. The beneficial bacteria will be attached to substrate, decor and mostly in the filter, especially if there are bio-filtration elements in the filter - these should be kept wet. All other used water can be discarded and fresh water can be used in the new setup. Of course, the new water needs to be treated as/if necessary, have the correct temparture and the stock must acclimated to the water properly.
One 'could' move the water, but it serves little purpose in the process and just complicates the move.


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Old 05-01-2011, 11:16 PM   #8
 
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There is very little beneficial bacteria in old water so there is no need to "try to keep as much water as you can" as in your original post. The beneficial bacteria will be attached to substrate, decor and mostly in the filter, especially if there are bio-filtration elements in the filter - these should be kept wet. All other used water can be discarded and fresh water can be used in the new setup. Of course, the new water needs to be treated as/if necessary, have the correct temparture and the stock must acclimated to the water properly.
One 'could' move the water, but it serves little purpose in the process and just complicates the move.

I'am not gonna keep going back and forth about the proper methods in moving because there are a number of ways to do it. Everthing i.e Water, Gravel, Decor and the filter media works TOGETHER. Moving an aquarium of any substancial size can be complicated but anything that serve's a good purpose in keeping your fish healthy and living, to me is necessary, no matter how small a purpose you may think it will serve. "Trying to keep as much water as you can" might have been a bit much. Remember though, a lot of beneficial bacteria will be lost no matter what i.e. washing the gravel, this will remove a lot of the bacteria from the gravel.
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