1st time w/ 29 g tank; 1 week old; 14 fish; things are NOT GOOD!! - Page 2
Tropical Fish

Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources » Freshwater Fish and Aquariums » Beginner Freshwater Aquarium » 1st time w/ 29 g tank; 1 week old; 14 fish; things are NOT GOOD!!

1st time w/ 29 g tank; 1 week old; 14 fish; things are NOT GOOD!!

This is a discussion on 1st time w/ 29 g tank; 1 week old; 14 fish; things are NOT GOOD!! within the Beginner Freshwater Aquarium forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> Diagnosis Ich / Ick Typical behaviours of clinically infected fish include: Anorexia (loss of appetite, refusing all food, with consequential wasting) Rapid breathing Hiding ...

Check out these freshwater fish profiles
Swordtail
Swordtail
Yoyo Loach
Yoyo Loach
Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools vBmenu Seperating Image Search this Thread vBmenu Seperating Image
1st time w/ 29 g tank; 1 week old; 14 fish; things are NOT GOOD!!
Old 03-03-2010, 10:43 PM   #11
 
Diagnosis Ich / Ick

Typical behaviours of clinically infected fish include:
  • Anorexia (loss of appetite, refusing all food, with consequential wasting)
  • Rapid breathing
  • Hiding abnormally/ not schooling
  • Resting on the bottom
  • Flashing
  • Rubbing and scratching against objects
A subclinically infected fish will not show any of these signs. For example, a healthy fish with a newly attached trophozoite will not yet have clinical disease. The trophozoite will not become visible to the naked eye until it has fed on the fish and grown to one or two millimetres. A trophozoite attached to the gills usually is not readily seen. A subclinically infected fish may initially only have a single trophozoite.
[edit] Skin

Visible Ich lesions are usually seen as one or several characteristic white spots on the body or fins of the fish. The white spots are single cells called trophozoites or trophonts, which feed on the tissues of the host and may grow to 1 mm in diameter. A smear should show ciliates if white spot is present.
LivinNandbyHim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2010, 11:31 PM   #12
 
Austin's Avatar
 
Removing activated carbon won't do anything detrimental to your tank. We wouldn't recommend it if it did. ;P I'm not SURE of the actual function of activated carbon. I don't use it in a few of my tanks and they are just fine. I only use it in the tanks with activated carbon in the filter cartridges, and I don't change the filter cartridges ever.

Salt is good to fight ich because ich doesn't really like salt. Most fish (aside from mollies and such) don't like salt much either, but they have a higher tolerance for it than ich does.

Fish will be fine in 80-85 range temporarily... 85 might be pushing it.. dunno. Same way as salt, the heat stresses the ich and can kill it, while fish are much more capable of handling those temperatures than the ich.

Ich is a very annoying disease. I'm not sure there's any surefire way to get rid of it. Lot's of people will have their own ways and opinions on what works for them.

Try not to stress over it too much. Lot's of us have been in your position (well, I have) before, and we know it's frustrating. The most important thing is you're doing all you can for your fish. Hopefully it'll all turn out well.
Austin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 02:44 AM   #13
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
Your tap water might contain nitrates, which would explain the relatively high nitrate reading despite your tank not being cycled yet.

Honestly, with your pH being so high and your hard water, I honestly don't think you're going to have much success in keeping soft water species unless you do something to soften your water and drop the pH (such as buying an RO machine and using a mix of RO and tap water in your tanks). That can be expensive and stressful, so I think a better option would be stocking your tank around your water parameters rather than trying to adjust your parameters to suit your fish. Barbs, tetras, angelfish, etc. are all softwater species. The two most common setups for harder water are livebearers (like your mollies) and African rift lake cichlids. Of the two, livebearers are going to be simpler as they aren't very demanding. This is what I was referring to with "rethinking your stocking." Schooling fish need to be kept in appropriate sized schools but more importantly, the softwater fish aren't going to do well in your water (as evidenced by the angels already dying).

To put it bluntly, cycling a tank full of fish that have ich isn't going to be easy and there's no advice that can be given that's going to guarantee the survival of all of your fish at this point. High temperatures and salt can both be used to combat ich but, as Austin pointed out, both do add to the stress level of your fish, something compounded by the cycling process. I don't think the salt is really worth it since you're going to be doing water changes quite often in this cycling tank. Instead, I'd go by heat alone; increase the tank temperature (slowly!) to 84 or so and keep an eye on your water parameters, doing water changes whenever ammonia or nitrite hits 0.50 ppm.

Just hang in there, keep your water quality in tip-top shape and keep us posted. Good luck!
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to iamntbatman For This Useful Post:
LivinNandbyHim (03-04-2010)
Old 03-04-2010, 02:47 AM   #14
 
Austin's Avatar
 
*high-jacks thread* I have angelfish and my water is rock hard here. I don't do anything to make it soft either. :( My angelfish have even bred before and I have 3 surviving babies about 2-3 inches tall in body length (excluding fins) now... :X Are my angelfish living a sad life do you think? :/
Austin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 03:31 AM   #15
 
1077's Avatar
 
Angelfish are surviving, they perhaps are not thriving or you would have many ,many ,baby angelfish in my opinion.
Many fish can adapt to water parameters that may or may not be ideal so long as those parameters remain stable and are not too far from suggested pH,temp,Kh,Gh recommended for that species due in large part to breeders who have over time,, managed to breed strains that have slowly adapted to these slightly different waters.
Is not going to work always for all species ,or different strains of same species. Always best in my view,,to keep as a general rule, softwater fish in soft water, and hardwater fish in hard water.
There will ALWAYS be those who say,,, I keep my Betta in a unfiltered ,unheated vase,I keep my Goldfish in a two gallon bowl,or I keep my softwater fish in liquid rock. The longterm results are fairly predictable.
Sick fish,low birth rates should they spawn,deformities in young fish,internal organ failures,and increased suceptibility to disease and or bacterial pathogens along with shortened lifespan. Doesn't make fish keeping very enjoyable and I would ask ,,what is the point?
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 03:34 AM   #16
 
Austin's Avatar
 
Interesting point... but I do hope my angelfish aren't suffering like those bettas in 1/2 gallon unfiltered unheated bowls.
Austin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 03:52 AM   #17
 
1077's Avatar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamntbatman View Post
Your tap water might contain nitrates, which would explain the relatively high nitrate reading despite your tank not being cycled yet.

Honestly, with your pH being so high and your hard water, I honestly don't think you're going to have much success in keeping soft water species unless you do something to soften your water and drop the pH (such as buying an RO machine and using a mix of RO and tap water in your tanks). That can be expensive and stressful, so I think a better option would be stocking your tank around your water parameters rather than trying to adjust your parameters to suit your fish. Barbs, tetras, angelfish, etc. are all softwater species. The two most common setups for harder water are livebearers (like your mollies) and African rift lake cichlids. Of the two, livebearers are going to be simpler as they aren't very demanding. This is what I was referring to with "rethinking your stocking." Schooling fish need to be kept in appropriate sized schools but more importantly, the softwater fish aren't going to do well in your water (as evidenced by the angels already dying).

To put it bluntly, cycling a tank full of fish that have ich isn't going to be easy and there's no advice that can be given that's going to guarantee the survival of all of your fish at this point. High temperatures and salt can both be used to combat ich but, as Austin pointed out, both do add to the stress level of your fish, something compounded by the cycling process. I don't think the salt is really worth it since you're going to be doing water changes quite often in this cycling tank. Instead, I'd go by heat alone; increase the tank temperature (slowly!) to 84 or so and keep an eye on your water parameters, doing water changes whenever ammonia or nitrite hits 0.50 ppm.

Just hang in there, keep your water quality in tip-top shape and keep us posted. Good luck!



+one. Would also maybe add an airstone to help provide oxygen. At higher temps,there is less oxygen in the water and airstone would help in this regard.
1077 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 04:59 AM   #18
 
maybe it is the hardwater.

Simple , plain, blunt honesty sometimes is the best answer. Looks like one by one, these fish are starting to do head stands. seeing a lot of panting. water is only at 78 * now. Heater is on. throughout day from early am yesterday to now 6 am of next day change of 4 * (approx 24 hrs) . no carbon filter in. used the dechlorinator, the stress zyme, the PH treatments, a couple of ick curing tablets. and things just keep going bad and not better. maybe it is the hardwater. it doesn't seem like the ph came down much if any based on the test strips.

what makes them stand on their heads??? can't find an answer online

This web site / forum is a wonderful gift that keeps on giving to so many people!! Thanks to everyone for their concern and advice and support.

Last edited by LivinNandbyHim; 03-04-2010 at 05:01 AM.. Reason: clarify a point of time
LivinNandbyHim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 05:07 AM   #19
 
quick cure quoted to me to be miracle drug. any successes or failures?

(no brainer, but....) >>> aquarium salt is not = to non iodized table salt or epsom salt?? must be aquarium salt??? just checking . :op

also; thanks for the gentle rebuke( which was actually reassuring) about the carbon filter >>> Removing activated carbon won't do anything detrimental to your tank. We wouldn't recommend it if it did. ;P <<<<<
LivinNandbyHim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-04-2010, 05:09 AM   #20
 
iamntbatman's Avatar
 
Tiger barbs are prone to do that sort of thing anyway, but they might do it more if they're stressed out.

I don't think you need to be using all of those chemicals, as this can create a sort of chemical soup that results in a very unbalanced tank. Apart from the dechlorinator, there's really nothing else you need (maybe some ich medication, especially since the tank isn't really all that warm). Just be careful with the ich meds as some fish are very sensitive to it. The Stress Zyme isn't needed and the products designed to mess with your pH are going to cause more problems than they solve.

Keep on hangin' in there!
iamntbatman is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How many fish can I add at a time to 75 gallon cycled tank? azzip4 Beginner Freshwater Aquarium 1 07-24-2009 12:07 PM
When is a good time to introduce fry into main tanks? Hellhole Livebearers 1 02-27-2008 01:00 PM
new tank ... time for new fish - which ones?!? richlovesboys Freshwater and Tropical Fish 10 07-25-2007 06:32 PM
Long time fish lover first time forum poster Dk Introduce Yourself 7 02-13-2007 07:04 PM
My new tank, This time.... WITH FISH :) Firefighter337 Freshwater Journals 14 02-05-2007 03:13 PM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:29 PM.