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150g South American rainforest

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150g South American rainforest
Old 05-30-2012, 02:09 PM   #11
 
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Assuming now that the water will be very soft and slightly acidic, the choice of fish is limitless. I also recommend you browse the profiles, look at the fish species under Characins (the tetra, pencilfish, hatchetfish are there), and then the Catfish, and perhaps Cichlids (some of both categories are South American). The profiles suggest compatibility issues, numbers for each species, any special decor. The habitat info is also included, both source and specifics of the watercourse (quiet stream, flooded forest, fast river...these are critical as fish from each of these will not always work together).

On the coral red pencilfish, yes, i have a group of wild caught fish that have spawned regularly and I have fry developing in the same tank. I have kept most all of the pencilfish in the profiles. I can answer any questions on this group of fish though there is good info in the profiles (i wrote them).

Byron.
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Old 05-30-2012, 02:12 PM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
Assuming now that the water will be very soft and slightly acidic, the choice of fish is limitless. I also recommend you browse the profiles, look at the fish species under Characins (the tetra, pencilfish, hatchetfish are there), and then the Catfish, and perhaps Cichlids (some of both categories are South American). The profiles suggest compatibility issues, numbers for each species, any special decor. The habitat info is also included, both source and specifics of the watercourse (quiet stream, flooded forest, fast river...these are critical as fish from each of these will not always work together).

On the coral red pencilfish, yes, i have a group of wild caught fish that have spawned regularly and I have fry developing in the same tank. I have kept most all of the pencilfish in the profiles. I can answer any questions on this group of fish though there is good info in the profiles (i wrote them).

Byron.
Would the Coral Red Pencil fish be too small to keep with Discus?
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Old 05-30-2012, 04:12 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by Termato View Post
Would the Coral Red Pencil fish be too small to keep with Discus?
Perhaps, depending upon circumstances. When the discus begin approaching their 5-6 inch size, they should not have small torpedo-shaped fish present, but if the fish had all grown up in the same tank, the discus might not be inclined to regard them as food, since the other fish would be mature-sized too. After all, cardinal tetra are often suggested as suitable fish with discus, though I believe Jack Wattley has cautioned against this. I don't think this is as much an issue as it is with angelfish, which are more predatory by nature.
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:29 AM   #14
 
Thanks again Olympia and Termato. At this point I am just looking for suggestions and recommendations to consider. How did you conclude that 90 fish would be the appropriate number to house in a 150 gallon aquarium? A long time ago, the rule of thumb was one inch per gallon. I'm assuming with all the new equipment and technology available today, that has changed?
My major dilemma is the ago-old one of wanting to include as many different varieties of small, peaceful, colorful "core tetras" (keeping in mind that there are some with "schooling" and "pack/group" habits) while having enough members of each variety for the proper visual affect.
I'm also looking for other varieties of fish that meet the biotope conditions that will complement the tetras. Some that would swim at different levels such as hatchetfish and headstanders, but also some larger in size - without being so large that the tetras serve as tasty morsels. I was considering discus (not angels), but additional reading suggests that I might have to settle for one of the peaceful South American dwarf ciclids.
Again, I am open to suggestions, especially from posters on this website who have far more expertise and experience than I.
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:12 AM   #15
 
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Originally Posted by lesandjill View Post
Thanks again Olympia and Termato. At this point I am just looking for suggestions and recommendations to consider. How did you conclude that 90 fish would be the appropriate number to house in a 150 gallon aquarium? A long time ago, the rule of thumb was one inch per gallon. I'm assuming with all the new equipment and technology available today, that has changed?
My major dilemma is the ago-old one of wanting to include as many different varieties of small, peaceful, colorful "core tetras" (keeping in mind that there are some with "schooling" and "pack/group" habits) while having enough members of each variety for the proper visual affect.
I'm also looking for other varieties of fish that meet the biotope conditions that will complement the tetras. Some that would swim at different levels such as hatchetfish and headstanders, but also some larger in size - without being so large that the tetras serve as tasty morsels. I was considering discus (not angels), but additional reading suggests that I might have to settle for one of the peaceful South American dwarf ciclids.
Again, I am open to suggestions, especially from posters on this website who have far more expertise and experience than I.
I'll answer this in general terms at this point.

The number of fish that any aquarium can accommodate is dependent upon several factors. A 150g aquarium might house 500 or more fish, or it may only house 1 or 2 and be maxed out. Depends upon the fish--and not just their size, but their temperament, behaviours, environmental needs, etc. The inch of fish per gallon "guide" is faulty at best if these other factors are not considered in the equation. And filtration [referring to your "new equipment and technology"] plays some part in this but a very small part.

The fish themselves are the significant factor. They must share near-identical requirements in environment: meaning water parameters (GH, pH and temperature) and aquascape--wood, rock, sand, gravel, plants, level of light/shade, water flow either minimal or stronger...fish have differing needs in all these areas. Then of course there is the natural behaviour which determines numbers, species that will co-habitat, etc.

All of the afore-mentioned factors affect fish significantly; stress is caused when any environmental factor required by the fish is not provided.

We can delve into specifics from here.

Byron.
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Old 05-31-2012, 11:18 AM   #16
 
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Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I'll answer this in general terms at this point.

The number of fish that any aquarium can accommodate is dependent upon several factors. A 150g aquarium might house 500 or more fish, or it may only house 1 or 2 and be maxed out. Depends upon the fish--and not just their size, but their temperament, behaviours, environmental needs, etc. The inch of fish per gallon "guide" is faulty at best if these other factors are not considered in the equation. And filtration [referring to your "new equipment and technology"] plays some part in this but a very small part.

The fish themselves are the significant factor. They must share near-identical requirements in environment: meaning water parameters (GH, pH and temperature) and aquascape--wood, rock, sand, gravel, plants, level of light/shade, water flow either minimal or stronger...fish have differing needs in all these areas. Then of course there is the natural behaviour which determines numbers, species that will co-habitat, etc.

All of the afore-mentioned factors affect fish significantly; stress is caused when any environmental factor required by the fish is not provided.

We can delve into specifics from here.

Byron.
Well said Byron, Thank you.

The one inch per gallon rule is really meant to keep beginners from overstocking their tanks.

With the fish I suggested and the full Amazon scape you plan, it would be fine having those fish. You could even bring each school of tetra down to 15 to have a nice schooling effect and have 4 different species such as cardinals, diamond, some pencil fish, and a species of hatchets. All possibilities.

Honestly, it will be easier if you can name the species you would like to have in the tank from our suggestions, your research, etc. then we can give you some good stocking ideas.

Stocking a tank is really based on the size of the fish, the plants in the tank and the experience level of the fish keeper (and a few other variables like Byron mentioned). When keeping bigger fish, they produce a higher bio load which means you can't have as many fish.

--------

Discus are Cichlids.
Scientific Name: Symphysodon aequifasciatus
Family: Cichlidae, Subfamily Cichlasomatinae

Heckel Discus
Scientific Name: Symphysodon discus
Family: Cichlidae, Subfamily Cichlasomatinae

Click the gray to see the profile.

They are actually, as far as I know, the MOST peaceful cichlids. Bolivian Rams are also peaceful, but they are not as big and require cooler waters than the Discus.

Last edited by Termato; 05-31-2012 at 11:24 AM..
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:28 AM   #17
 
There are so many small, peaceful, colorful tetras that I would like to include as many of these as possible while keeping the numbers of each large enough for the proper affect. So, here goes - green fire, blue, rummy nose, glowlight, pretty, blue king, bleeding heart, flame, lemon, Hyphessobrycon rosecus, Hyphessobrycon sweglesi, ornate, cardinal, neon, green neon, emperor and red-eye emperor. Habitat might be a better term than biotope, as I am more concerned that the fish selected have similar water and temperature requirements. Color contrasts and behavioral characteristics should also be a factor. So, which ones would you recommend and how many of each?
What tetra relatives would you suggest (hatchetfish and pencil fish) for the upper level of the aquarium? Which ones and how many?
What catfish would you recommend for the bottom level of the aquarium and how many?
Would either discus or angelfish provide the large inhabitants that seem to be missing or would they not be compatible with tetras because of either water and temperature conditions or because the smaller tetras might become fish food? Which and how many?
What about the smaller, peaceful South American ciclids? Which and how many?
I hope that this provides some guidelines for your suggestions and recommendations. In any case, it should allow you to get more specific. In the meantime, I will continue to research the web for ideas and information before I go any further.
Thanks for your time and cooperation. I look forward to your input on this matter and am, at this point, open to your replies.
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Old 06-01-2012, 11:08 AM   #18
 
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Originally Posted by lesandjill View Post
There are so many small, peaceful, colorful tetras that I would like to include as many of these as possible while keeping the numbers of each large enough for the proper affect. So, here goes - green fire, blue, rummy nose, glowlight, pretty, blue king, bleeding heart, flame, lemon, Hyphessobrycon rosecus, Hyphessobrycon sweglesi, ornate, cardinal, neon, green neon, emperor and red-eye emperor. Habitat might be a better term than biotope, as I am more concerned that the fish selected have similar water and temperature requirements. Color contrasts and behavioral characteristics should also be a factor. So, which ones would you recommend and how many of each?
What tetra relatives would you suggest (hatchetfish and pencil fish) for the upper level of the aquarium? Which ones and how many?
What catfish would you recommend for the bottom level of the aquarium and how many?
Would either discus or angelfish provide the large inhabitants that seem to be missing or would they not be compatible with tetras because of either water and temperature conditions or because the smaller tetras might become fish food? Which and how many?
What about the smaller, peaceful South American ciclids? Which and how many?
I hope that this provides some guidelines for your suggestions and recommendations. In any case, it should allow you to get more specific. In the meantime, I will continue to research the web for ideas and information before I go any further.
Thanks for your time and cooperation. I look forward to your input on this matter and am, at this point, open to your replies.
There are too many species listed here for me to dissect the issues, but I will say that some of these cannot be kept together. Please have a read of our profiles, these are all included as far as I know. Their individual traits and issues are documented there, and i would only be repeating what i put in the profiles if I were to spell this out. If you narrow things down considerably, I might have more to say.
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Old 06-01-2012, 02:20 PM   #19
 
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Originally Posted by lesandjill View Post
There are so many small, peaceful, colorful tetras that I would like to include as many of these as possible while keeping the numbers of each large enough for the proper affect. So, here goes - green fire, blue, rummy nose, glowlight, pretty, blue king, bleeding heart, flame, lemon, Hyphessobrycon rosecus, Hyphessobrycon sweglesi, ornate, cardinal, neon, green neon, emperor and red-eye emperor. Habitat might be a better term than biotope, as I am more concerned that the fish selected have similar water and temperature requirements. Color contrasts and behavioral characteristics should also be a factor. So, which ones would you recommend and how many of each?
What tetra relatives would you suggest (hatchetfish and pencil fish) for the upper level of the aquarium? Which ones and how many?
What catfish would you recommend for the bottom level of the aquarium and how many?
Would either discus or angelfish provide the large inhabitants that seem to be missing or would they not be compatible with tetras because of either water and temperature conditions or because the smaller tetras might become fish food?
Please read the profiles. Like Byron said, a lot of these do not go in the same water.

Before picking bottom level fish. Please choose the main fish in the tank.

Yes, Discus make perfect centerpiece fish. You can use any of the tetras I suggested or the pencil fish that Byron suggested along with them. They prefer water above 80F.

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Originally Posted by lesandjill View Post
Which and how many?
I have specified species in above posts same as numbers. At least 15 of each species would create a good schooling effect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lesandjill View Post
What about the smaller, peaceful South American ciclids? Which and how many?
None that I know of will work with Discus. Water parameters and temperaments will cause issues.

If you choose not to keep discus then it is a different story. Discus in my opinion are THE amazon fish their just beautiful.

Byron, what do you think about the cichlids?

Quote:
Originally Posted by lesandjill View Post
I hope that this provides some guidelines for your suggestions and recommendations. In any case, it should allow you to get more specific. In the meantime, I will continue to research the web for ideas and information before I go any further.
Thanks for your time and cooperation. I look forward to your input on this matter and am, at this point, open to your replies.
Please read what we have posted above in previous posts as many of the questions you have are already answer.

Thanks.

Last edited by Termato; 06-01-2012 at 02:22 PM..
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Old 06-01-2012, 02:35 PM   #20
 
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Byron, what do you think about the cichlids?
In general I never recomend more than one species of cichlid in a given tank--and understand, here we are talking South American cichlids, not African rift lake which is quite another matter. It can work depending upon species and in very large tanks.

Discus or angelfish (never together) would be a nice centrepiece, with suitable shoals of characins and substrate fish.
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