100g tank - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 01:36 PM Thread Starter
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Post 100g tank

Hello, this is my first post. I am about to set up an 100 gallon tank, and want to know how to clean it and which filter to use. It is extremely filthy and needs washing. Also, I am not sure whether to use a sponge filter, canister, or hang on filter. Please help me, thanks.
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post #2 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 02:17 PM
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Water changes with gravel vacuums is the best way to clean a filthy tank. A beefier filtration system will go a long way to keeping it clean as well.

I run 2 canisters on my larger tanks - 55 and up. Each one is capable of filtering the tank on their own. Some will say that that is unnecessary, and they would be correct....from a water quality standpoint. However, I ask more of my filtration systems than merely maintaining water quality. My filtration systems also have to provide a circular flow in the tank, which is achieved by setting them up in opposition to one another. One pushes water along the front of the tank towards the seconds intake, and the second pushes water back along the back of the tank, towards the first's intake. In my experience the fish prefer such circulation. The other advantage of this is waste collection. Since setting up my tanks this way, I never see waste on the sand - keeps the tanks spotless. Another benefit, which boxercrazy mentioned, is that the filters don't need to be cleaned very often. The smaller the system, the more often it needs to be cleaned. I don't clean mine more than twice a year. And lastly, is redundancy, though that's really an afterthought for me. People say to run 2 heaters, that way in case one fails there is a backup. I don't see how this principle does not extend to filters.

Is a 2 canister setup ideal for every tank? No, of course not. Can many tanks benefit from such a setup? Yes, absolutely. It's up to each fish keeper to determine what's best for them, based on their needs and what they want to get out of it.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #3 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 02:25 PM
Plus another advantage to 2 cannisters is that you only clean one at a time not both together which is good for you biological system since one of them has the biological bacteria undisturbed
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post #4 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 03:02 PM Thread Starter
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with a limited budget, i was considering a Hagen hang over filter for the 100 gal that is $90, what do u think?
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post #5 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 03:39 PM
What's it rated for you should have more than what it's rated for probably twice as mucho have 120 gallon with 260 gallons filtration can you look on kijiji for used cannisters
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post #6 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 05:14 PM
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I moved these last five posts out of the original thread in which they were posted and started a new thread of its own. While the subject was related, being filtration, the two issues from two different members are distinct and will be better served separated.

To your filter question: what fish are intended for this tank? Some aquarists incorrectly assume all fish will be fine with any filter, but this is not the case. Also, if you intend live plants has a bearing.

There is actually some detriment to too much filtration, or more correctly stated, to having too many/large filters on the tank. A filter can only do the job it was designed for, and provided the filter is adequate for the task (tank volume, fish load, etc) you will not gain anything by having more filters. You will waste your money buying them (they are not inexpensive) and you will waste money running them; but depending upon the fish, they (the fish) may be adversely affected and this means stress which is poor health.

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Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #7 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 07:09 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Byron for the insight. I just bought a Aquaclear power tank from amazon rated at 110 gallons. I own a 100 gal tank and will raise Blue tilapia (~ the size of a crappie, 5 pounds). I assume what the tank is rated for can be applied (a filter rated for 100 gal can be used on a 100 gal tank). will this filter, along with a 500 watt heater be enough for a few adult 12 inch long fish?
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post #8 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 07:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mvgeiger View Post
Thanks Byron for the insight. I just bought a Aquaclear power tank from amazon rated at 110 gallons. I own a 100 gal tank and will raise Blue tilapia (~ the size of a crappie, 5 pounds). I assume what the tank is rated for can be applied (a filter rated for 100 gal can be used on a 100 gal tank). will this filter, along with a 500 watt heater be enough for a few adult 12 inch long fish?
This is a situation where you do want a bit more filtration than what you would need with small fish and planted tanks. But beyond this, I can't offer much because I have never gone down this road, so I will leave it to our "large fish" experts to provide more pertinent information. I never guess.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #9 of 20 Old 03-02-2013, 11:45 PM
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It's funny how each forum has their own distinct collective opinion on what's best about such things.

In my opinion, an AC110 will not be enough for your tank.

125 - BGK, chanchito cichlid, pictus cats, silver dollars, palmas bichir
125 - cichlids (severums, bolivian rams, chocolate), rainbows ( turquoise, red), loaches (angelicus, zebra, kuhli and horseface), plecos (BN, RL and clown), denison barbs, tiretrack eel, pearl gouramis, betta
90 - Congo tetras, african knife, upside down cats, spotted ctenopoma, kribensis, delhezzi bichir
2.5 - betta
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post #10 of 20 Old 03-03-2013, 03:46 AM
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I am assuming this is a used tank or one that has been collecting dust and you want to know how to proceed to clean it.
First, use a vacumn to pull out as much dirt as you can. If you have hard deposits on the glass, then use a scraping tool with a metal blade to remove it. Keep the tool wet when scraping. Be careful how you scrape or you will scratch the glass. If the tank is acrylic, then someone will have to advise on how to remove hard deposits.
afterwhich, use clean water and a sponge and wipe down the glass. After cleaning you can sanitize the aquarium with 3% hydrogen peroxide. Fill the tank and add 15 ml of hydrogen peroxide for every 8 gallons. That would come to 188 ml. For the best effect, add the hydrogen peroxide at night and when the lights in the room are out. Now run your filter for 72 hours. Aferwhich all of the peroxide will be converted to oxygen and water. I recommend dumping the water as it will be easier to add the substrate when the tank is empty. Be sure to rinse it well before adding.
Do you know about water conditioning such as chlorine, chloramine and heavy metals removal?
Let us know how you plan to add livestock and/or plants and we can advise on how to proceed.

Last edited by rjordan390; 03-03-2013 at 03:52 AM.
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