10 Gallon re-stocking.? - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 08-28-2010, 11:49 AM Thread Starter
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10 Gallon re-stocking.?

So after many weeks of planning and getting everything ready, my 10Gallon and 5.5Gallon tanks are both cycled and running with fish in. I have read multiple times that 15 of either neons or wcmm is safe BUT pushing the limits of a 10 gallon tank. I do not want 15 of only neons or wcmm, so i wanna do 7&7 of each. Rightnow my 10 gallon is stocked with 6 wcmm, 5 neons, and 1 guppy. So removing the guppy and adding 1 wcmm, and 2 neons wouldn't really fluctuate the water chem right? I will be moving the guppy to my 5.5 Gallon tank along with 3-4 WCMM that i have bred. So my question is if 7 Neons and 7 WCMM is safe for them. If not, what about 7 neons and 5-6 WCMM?
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post #2 of 6 Old 08-28-2010, 11:58 AM
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Where have you read that 15 neons will work in a 10g? That I do not agree with. Six is pushing things. Neons attain 1.5 inches and need some space to swim a bit if they are to be free of stress and healthy and live normal lives.

White Clouds the same, six limit; they need room to swim even more as they are more active.

Check out our profiles, both fish are included, and info on minimum tank sizes (24 inches in length is the minimum for both species). In a 10g I would only go with the dwarf species of characins or cyprinid, with some bottom fish.

Putting these medium fish in a 10g is like keeping a black lab in a 4-foot cage. Yes, it will live, eat and all the rest...but will it really be healthy? Same principal with fish, but it is even more critical because fish are confined to the water space whereas a dog in a cage at least has clean air circulating through it.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 6 Old 08-28-2010, 11:59 AM
I have 10 Neons in a 10g and they're happy as clams. :O Never exceeded the bioload either.

Again, heavily plants though.

:[ I'm a bad man

Last edited by CaliforniaFishkeeper; 08-28-2010 at 12:04 PM.
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post #4 of 6 Old 08-28-2010, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by CaliforniaFishkeeper View Post
I have 10 Neons in a 10g and they're happy as clams. :O Never exceeded the bioload either.

Again, heavily plants though.
You can't know what stress it may be causing, nor can you know the internal issues. Neither can I of my own knowledge. My analogy of the dog in a cage is apropos.

Space and bioload are related but also separate issues. The water can be kept spotless with plants, daily 50% water changes, etc., taking the one extreme--but the space is still inadequate for 10 neons.

The info in the profiles is not something I make up. I conduct extensive research and assimilate information from reputable and reliable ichthyologists and sites. What I include in the profiles on tank sizes, compatibility, numbers, environment, water parameters is the consensus of those who do know these things; where someone may differ, I mention that. You can take the guides in the profiles here as being the best assurance of providing a healthy environment for your fish. And that should be the goal of every aquarist.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 6 Old 08-28-2010, 12:27 PM
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You can't know what stress it may be causing, nor can you know the internal issues. Neither can I of my own knowledge. My analogy of the dog in a cage is apropos.

Space and bioload are related but also separate issues. The water can be kept spotless with plants, daily 50% water changes, etc., taking the one extreme--but the space is still inadequate for 10 neons.

The info in the profiles is not something I make up. I conduct extensive research and assimilate information from reputable and reliable ichthyologists and sites. What I include in the profiles on tank sizes, compatibility, numbers, environment, water parameters is the consensus of those who do know these things; where someone may differ, I mention that. You can take the guides in the profiles here as being the best assurance of providing a healthy environment for your fish. And that should be the goal of every aquarist.

Byron.
Neither of us is in a position to say whether or not there are any internal issues being caused by this, but after having had these guys for over a year and watching them each and every day wouldn't you say I would be somewhat of an expert concerning this particular group of Neon Tetra? I mean, there are signs you can look for as an indicator of stress.

As for being stunted... In the time I've had them they've grown from about 1/4 of an inch when I purchased them to about 1 1/3 inches now, so that should be in the normal range as well, correct?

EDIT: We can take this to a new thread if need be. I would really like to have a look at any literature concerning Neon Tetras that you think could be of help to me in providing the optimum care for my beloved Neons.

:[ I'm a bad man

Last edited by CaliforniaFishkeeper; 08-28-2010 at 12:42 PM.
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post #6 of 6 Old 08-28-2010, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliforniaFishkeeper View Post
Neither of us is in a position to say whether or not there are any internal issues being caused by this, but after having had these guys for over a year and watching them each and every day wouldn't you say I would be somewhat of an expert concerning this particular group of Neon Tetra? I mean, there are signs you can look for as an indicator of stress.

As for being stunted... In the time I've had them they've grown from about 1/4 of an inch when I purchased them to about 1 1/3 inches now, so that should be in the normal range as well, correct?

EDIT: We can take this to a new thread if need be. I would really like to have a look at any literature concerning Neon Tetras that you think could be of help to me in providing the optimum care for my beloved Neons.
While we do not allow links to other forums, I will provide some links to sites that will provide the same data as in our profile with respect to Paracheirodon innesi.

Neon tetra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Paracheirodon innesi, Neon tetra : aquarium
Paracheirodon innesi - The Free Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Encyclopedia Anyone Can Edit - The Aquarium Wiki [this site recommends 15g but that is a 24 inch length]
Tropical fish - Paracheirodon innesi - Neon tetra [50 litres which is closer to 15g than 10, but it is the length that is the issue]

These sites recommend 30g minimum:
Neon Tetra (Paracheirodon innesi)
Paracheirodon Innesi (Neon Tetra) - FishandTips.com

Baensch & Riehl, Aquarium Atlas, vol. 1, gives 60cm/24 inch length tank.

Edit: Apparently the links fail when a fish name is included as it takes you to our profile. I can't get around that, so I will PM you the links. B.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If youíre going to take it under your wing then youíre responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]

Last edited by Byron; 08-28-2010 at 01:24 PM.
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