Sunset honey gourami eggs - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

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post #1 of 13 Old 09-02-2011, 05:44 PM Thread Starter
Ami
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Sunset honey gourami eggs

Hi,
I was really lucky to see our honey gouramis mate under a huge bubble nest. I was curious as to how long the eggs take to hatch. Papa gourami is constantly blowing bubbles and chasing away anything that swims

Any pointers, suggestions, sharing of expreience will be appreciated.

The gouramis are in the 55 gallon tank. Details are in the aquarium profile.

I got a camera that actually woks now. I'll post pics soon
Thanks,
Ami
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post #2 of 13 Old 09-06-2011, 10:04 AM
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Male gourami are very effective at protecting the nest, as you are observing. Eggs should hatch in 24-36 hours. Once the fry appear, the male will likely no longer be protective. Make sure the surface is thick with floating plants; this protects many of the fry from predation. They eat microscopic plankton which will occur in the floating plants to some extent, depending upon the length of time the tank has been set up with plants. You can also buy infusoria to feed them. Dried leaves also provide infusoria. Very finely ground flake food can be added, just a pinch, for when they are able to handle that. In a mat of floating vegetation some will survive. Make sure the tank is very well covered; the air above the surface must be warm and humid or the labrinth organ will not develop properly.

Byron.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #3 of 13 Old 09-06-2011, 10:39 AM Thread Starter
Ami
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Male gourami are very effective at protecting the nest, as you are observing. Eggs should hatch in 24-36 hours. Once the fry appear, the male will likely no longer be protective. Make sure the surface is thick with floating plants; this protects many of the fry from predation. They eat microscopic plankton which will occur in the floating plants to some extent, depending upon the length of time the tank has been set up with plants. You can also buy infusoria to feed them. Dried leaves also provide infusoria. Very finely ground flake food can be added, just a pinch, for when they are able to handle that. In a mat of floating vegetation some will survive. Make sure the tank is very well covered; the air above the surface must be warm and humid or the labrinth organ will not develop properly.

Byron.
Oh dear ! I fear I don't have enough floating vegetation ! I just hope they haven't all been eaten. Anyways, I am sure they'll mate again. Fortunately I got a glass cover on one side and it well covered on the other side except for the hole for letting the HOB filter get into the tank.
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post #4 of 13 Old 09-06-2011, 11:35 AM
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Oh dear ! I fear I don't have enough floating vegetation ! I just hope they haven't all been eaten. Anyways, I am sure they'll mate again. Fortunately I got a glass cover on one side and it well covered on the other side except for the hole for letting the HOB filter get into the tank.
Cover sounds good. Yes, they will spawn repeatedly.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #5 of 13 Old 09-06-2011, 11:51 AM Thread Starter
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I finally got some good pics of my 55 gallon tank. They are on my aquarium page. Or just click the link

55 gallon community - 55 gallon Freshwater fish tank

Thanks to all of you who have made this possible with your inputs, write ups etc.
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post #6 of 13 Old 09-06-2011, 12:42 PM Thread Starter
Ami
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Cover sounds good. Yes, they will spawn repeatedly.
Hi Byron,
Here are the pics of of the female honey sunset gouramis (the larger one) and the male as well. I also got a good snap of the nest too. Man, it was really cool to see the two spawn. The male was constantly chasing the female away. But all of the sudden they twisted and clamped together for a few moments. Then the male chased the female away.
I was wondering...how does the male guard the nest in the night? Or scoop the eggs when they fall out of the bubble layer? Does it need some dim light?

I got 4 lilypads on the top. Is there any plant(s) you can recommend for the future? Would Anacharis work? I want to make sure the plants below get some light as well.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg SunsetHoney_Female.jpg (48.0 KB, 42 views)
File Type: jpg SunsetHoneyMale.jpg (41.6 KB, 40 views)
File Type: jpg SunsetHoney_Nest.jpg (42.4 KB, 41 views)
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post #7 of 13 Old 09-06-2011, 02:32 PM
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During light the male will pick up any eggs that may fall and spit them back into the nest. At night as far as I know, gourami "sleep" and fortunately so do most other fish except substrate fish that would get fallen eggs.

You will need a lot more surface plants to protect any fry, and plants that have thickness to them. Water Sprite is ideal and native to their habitat. Plants like Wisteria, Cabomba and Pennywort also work well if they are thick (several stems together). In the attached photo of a former setup I had, there are several Water Sprite plants on the surface, with dangling roots, and Wisteria growing up and across the surface. This is the sort of setting you want, so the fry can browse among the plant roots for food. I had several Chocolate Gourami and Sparkling Gourami fry survive in this 70g without any intervention from me.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 70g Jan 13-10.jpg (72.2 KB, 39 views)

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 13 Old 09-07-2011, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
Ami
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Wow ! That is a really beautiful aquarium. Do you have more pictures & info on it?
I'm going to head down to the local Petsmart and see if they have Water Sprite and Wisteria.
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post #9 of 13 Old 09-07-2011, 01:15 PM
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Wow ! That is a really beautiful aquarium. Do you have more pictures & info on it?
I'm going to head down to the local Petsmart and see if they have Water Sprite and Wisteria.
I tore this tank down, it really never did well. I had trouble with cyanobacteria, very bad bouts twice, then most of the fish died, not sure what but I suspect columnaris. The loaches all survived and are doing well in other tanks. Chocolate gourami are highly sensitive fish, and both species sucumbed very quickly to the columnaris. Near the end the Wisteria was nothing more than sticks; I don't have sufficient light, but left floating it does better as it is close to the light, and it works well for spawning gourami. I prefer Water Sprite though.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #10 of 13 Old 09-08-2011, 02:57 PM Thread Starter
Ami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron View Post
I tore this tank down, it really never did well. I had trouble with cyanobacteria, very bad bouts twice, then most of the fish died, not sure what but I suspect columnaris. The loaches all survived and are doing well in other tanks. Chocolate gourami are highly sensitive fish, and both species sucumbed very quickly to the columnaris. Near the end the Wisteria was nothing more than sticks; I don't have sufficient light, but left floating it does better as it is close to the light, and it works well for spawning gourami. I prefer Water Sprite though.
My local stores don't have water sprite =0( Would Javao moss be a good idea? I'm gonna go and get some wisteria, pennywort and some camboba. I'll let you know how things come along.
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