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Dwarf Gourami in a Community Tank??

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Dwarf Gourami in a Community Tank??
Old 01-10-2013, 07:31 PM   #11
 
What do you recommend doing with them? I love my babies and do not want to have to take them back :( is there anything I can do for the water (no chemicals)? If I added tetras, how many do you think would fit? I am looking for 10+ :) I love an active tank!

Also, what other fish can go in there? I am wandering if I can add strebai cory? I read they only get to 4 inches, I am going to do more research on those, before I make my decision. I just want to get some advice before I go for it.
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:40 PM   #12
 
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What do you recommend doing with them? I love my babies and do not want to have to take them back :( is there anything I can do for the water (no chemicals)? If I added tetras, how many do you think would fit? I am looking for 10+ :) I love an active tank!

Also, what other fish can go in there? I am wandering if I can add strebai cory? I read they only get to 4 inches, I am going to do more research on those, before I make my decision. I just want to get some advice before I go for it.

In a 55g you could have several groups of different tetra, provided they are compatible. I would go for groups of maybe 7 to 12/15, depending upon the species, some are best with more. Three or four or even five species, again depending on what they are. And substrate fish are fine, perhaps a group of corys, no less than five of a species, and you can mix any. Corydoras sterbai are nice; where did you read 4 inches? Three inches is max, and usually in aquaria they are around 2-2.5 inches. Use our profiles for this data.

I would myself not keep livebearers esp mollies in soft water. If you have another tank, it is easy to harden water, easier than the reverse. A substrate of aragonite sand or gravel is easiest.
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Old 01-10-2013, 07:54 PM   #13
 
I cannot find where I found the Sterbai Cory at; it was a fish store online. As far as housing fish, I have heard 1 gallon per inch of adult fish. Is this something you recommend as well? I do not want to overcrowd them and I do not mind if it is understocked, as long as they are all happy and healthy.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:49 AM   #14
 
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I cannot find where I found the Sterbai Cory at; it was a fish store online. As far as housing fish, I have heard 1 gallon per inch of adult fish. Is this something you recommend as well? I do not want to overcrowd them and I do not mind if it is understocked, as long as they are all happy and healthy.
It so happens I posted on this same topic just the other day; I'll copy that over, but first to answer your question on that "rule," it is useful as a guide for beginning aquarists who may be inclined to put too many fish in their tank without considering the mature size and compatibility issues that I will elaborate on in the quoted post. But there is much more. Here are my previous comments.

One thing we have to learn as aquarists is just what determines the number of fish we can have in a given tank. The bioload is obviously important, and yes, live plants help a lot with this. And so do regular partial water changes. But this is only one aspect.

The species of fish and their behaviours is of paramount importance. This is why I harp so much in threads about compatibility--but true compatibility. Fish that share the same specific requirements such as water parameters, water current from the filter, plants/wood/rock as cover or to break up territories, etc. will manage together better than those that do not. And then we come to numbers and behaviours. Shoaling fish need a group, and the more the better, and this actually helps the bioload because the fish will be less stressed so they will have less of an impact on the biology in the tank. If they are compatible in terms of their behaviours, they will be less stressed and this again impacts the biology. Fish that are forever nipping one another are sending out allomones (from species to species) and pheromones (within a species) that are chemical signals the other fish read and this can stress them further, negatively impacting the biological system.

Heiko Bleher has written about displays he has set up replicating natural biotopes in South America and elsewhere. The numbers of fish he puts in these tanks would astonish most aquarists. But it works, because the fish are truly compatible and are in their natural expected environment.

The above is from this thread if you want to follow all of it:
http://www.tropicalfishkeeping.com/f...livian-120140/

Byron.
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Old 01-12-2013, 12:59 PM   #15
 
You were talking about my mollies not doing so well long term in my water, it is possible for them to show signs as soon as two months? I bought a silver lyre tail molly, Dip, in November. She has done great until today. She is staying on the bottom with labored breathing, and her tail is turned to the side. Should I watch her close, or should I move her into a breeding net on the side of the tank? She is one of my favorite and I don't want to lose her! :(
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:26 PM   #16
 
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You were talking about my mollies not doing so well long term in my water, it is possible for them to show signs as soon as two months? I bought a silver lyre tail molly, Dip, in November. She has done great until today. She is staying on the bottom with labored breathing, and her tail is turned to the side. Should I watch her close, or should I move her into a breeding net on the side of the tank? She is one of my favorite and I don't want to lose her! :(
I am not a trained biologist, but in my completely honest opinion, yes, the soft water might well be the cause, or at the very least a contributor. Not having the essential minerals necessary for proper functioning of the fish's physiology not only weakens those organs and such, but adds stress, and stress weakens the fish even more so it is more suscpetible to disease. So yes, this is in my view all related.

I would get some calcareous sand or gravel for the substrate and set up a smaller tank for the mollies. A 20g long would be about minimum for 3 or 4. CarribSea make aragonite sand and gravel substrates, and just one bag would fill a 20g long tank. The 20g long is so-called because it is 30 inches long, whereas the "normal" 20g tank is 24 inches, and normally called a 20g high to differentiate.

Diagnosing fish ailments is not at all easy for most of us. There are so many factors. But prevention is the best, and part of this is providing as near-ideal watger as we can.

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Old 01-12-2013, 10:01 PM   #17
 
I moved her to my 10 gal QT and added a little salt. She is swimming around as happy as she can be. Thank you for your help!!

I am still looking at the Tetras and the Corys, trying to figure out which ones I will add to the big tank. I will post those and see what you think when I make my decision. :)
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Old 01-13-2013, 10:53 AM   #18
 
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I moved her to my 10 gal QT and added a little salt. She is swimming around as happy as she can be. Thank you for your help!!

I am still looking at the Tetras and the Corys, trying to figure out which ones I will add to the big tank. I will post those and see what you think when I make my decision. :)
Salt will help mollies, but you still need the other minerals so this too is only a short-term solution.
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Old 01-14-2013, 09:37 AM   #19
 
I understand completely! It was a fix until I can get them into the right water. i have a 20 gal tall (free) that is empty right now and is getting cycled for them.

As for the 55 gallon, I think I have found some fish I really like and would fit in my water range (I think). First is Bleeding heart tetras (maybe 7), Cochu (maybe 7 of these as well), Lemon Tetra (7 of those), and finally the Bandit Cory (4 or 5 of these). What do you think?
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:08 PM   #20
 
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I understand completely! It was a fix until I can get them into the right water. i have a 20 gal tall (free) that is empty right now and is getting cycled for them.

As for the 55 gallon, I think I have found some fish I really like and would fit in my water range (I think). First is Bleeding heart tetras (maybe 7), Cochu (maybe 7 of these as well), Lemon Tetra (7 of those), and finally the Bandit Cory (4 or 5 of these). What do you think?
Sounds generally fine for both tanks. I'm assuming the 20g molly tank has a calcareous substrate, that will be good.

And the 55g combo is fine, though with a couple of reservations. First, I would increase the corys up to 12-15, this can be different species with 4-5 of each. But any and all corys will always be in better health the more there are, whatever species. And second, be careful of the Cochu Tetra. This is a feisty little fish, very active, and must have a good number. I had to get rid of mine, they harassed the other tetra too much. You will not want any sedate fish in with these, should that be considered down the road. And they are sometimes nasty with other tetra, as I noted. A better but very similar coloured fish would be the Kerri Tetra. They are active, but much more peaceful. I had a group of 10 or so many years ago, very nice fish.

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Last edited by Byron; 01-14-2013 at 01:12 PM..
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