Betta Tankmates - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources
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post #1 of 11 Old 08-31-2012, 11:28 AM Thread Starter
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Betta Tankmates

What are good tankmates for bettas in a 10 gallon tank? I was thinking about these fish-
Threadfin Rainbow Fish (with female)
Bristlenose Pleco
Red Lizard Whiptail
Pristella tetras (with female)
Costello/January Tetra (with female)
Eyespot Rasbora
Banded Dwarf Loach (with female)
Male Guppies (with female)
Thanks guys!
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post #2 of 11 Old 08-31-2012, 11:39 AM
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What are good tankmates for bettas in a 10 gallon tank? I was thinking about these fish-
Threadfin Rainbow Fish (with female)
Bristlenose Pleco
Red Lizard Whiptail
Pristella tetras (with female)
Costello/January Tetra (with female)
Eyespot Rasbora
Banded Dwarf Loach (with female)
Male Guppies (with female)
Thanks guys!
I don't know about most of those fish, but when researching fish for my 10 gal with bettas, I read something about not keeping guppies and bettas together because they both have flowing long and colorful tails which one of the breeds (can't remember which, prob bettas) will nip at.
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post #3 of 11 Old 08-31-2012, 11:53 AM Thread Starter
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Note: not allof the fish mentioned will be with a betta, thye are just ideas.
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post #4 of 11 Old 09-01-2012, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by jack26707 View Post
Note: not allof the fish mentioned will be with a betta, thye are just ideas.
So wait.. You are asking our opinion on which would be best with betta, but you're saying that you don't even think all of the combinations will work?

Threadfin Rainbow Fish (with female) - females can be just as nasty as males. I don't think these are a good choice.
Bristlenose Pleco - tried and true; works great
Red Lizard Whiptail - another loriicarid, should work with betta, too.
Pristella tetras (with female) - these can be kept with males, too, but they should be kept in sufficient shoals to prevent any nipping; with betta I usually suggest 10+ individuals
Costello/January Tetra (with female) - see above comment
Eyespot Rasbora - could work, but due to it's small size and shy nature, it should be maintained in 10+ groups
Banded Dwarf Loach (with female) - would work with males, too, but should be maintained in 10+ groups to account for shyness
Male Guppies (with female) - these I do not recommend; females can be just as aggressive as males; if you want guppies, go with the less colorful female guppies.

---Izzy

Sitting by the koi pond

writings on fish and fishkeeping


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post #5 of 11 Old 09-02-2012, 06:28 PM
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Betta really are not community fish, so any other species is a risk from the start. Substrate fish are generally left alone, but this cannot be assured either. And the trouble can occur two ways.

The Betta may take a dislike to the other fish for various reasons, and if they are small--such as any linear fish like the tetra and rasbora mentioned, they may be eaten, or the attempt will be made. I once had a Betta who ate neons easily.

Alternatively, the other fish may go after the Betta. Betta are sedate fish with very extended fins, and this is quite a temptation for small characins and cyprinids.

It may not always occur, but either of the above occurs the majority of the time. Even if no physical confrontation occurs, the fish are sending out chemical signals of their intentions and this can cause stress. The beautiful Betta is best left on its own.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #6 of 11 Old 09-02-2012, 06:38 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Byron, maybe instead of the beta I'll get a dwarf gourami or 2-3 gupis instead
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post #7 of 11 Old 09-02-2012, 07:06 PM
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Thanks Byron, maybe instead of the beta I'll get a dwarf gourami or 2-3 gupis instead
Not meaning to rain on your parade, but the dwarf gourami is not a fish I wld recomend these days. They are often not healthy. The Honey Gourami is better, and similar in size and reddish colouration.

Not sure guppy are good with gourami... something doesn't seem right there.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #8 of 11 Old 09-02-2012, 07:17 PM Thread Starter
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Ok, i meant guppies OR gouramis... not both of them together with a small bottom feeder and maybe some ADFs or some tetras or rasboras?
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post #9 of 11 Old 09-03-2012, 09:46 AM
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Ok, i meant guppies OR gouramis... not both of them together with a small bottom feeder and maybe some ADFs or some tetras or rasboras?
A 10g is not much space. Many of the "normal" tetra willnot be at their best, since they need a group and some are more active. The "dwarf" species of characins or cyprinids (rasbora) are ideally suited to a 10g, or guppy or Endlers depending upon water parameters.

Have a check of the profiles, they include minim um tank sizes.

Byron Hosking, BMus, MA
Vancouver, BC, Canada

The aquarist is one who must learn the ways of the biologist, the chemist, and the veterinarian. [unknown source]

Something we all need to remember: The fish you've acquired was quite happy not being owned by you, minding its own business. If you’re going to take it under your wing then you’re responsible for it. Every aspect of its life is under your control, from water quality and temperature to swimming space. [Nathan Hill in PFK]
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post #10 of 11 Old 09-03-2012, 11:01 AM Thread Starter
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I was tinking maybe a couple of guppies, half a dozen pristella tetras, and maybe a couple of amano shrimp.
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