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tank "spiking"

This is a discussion on tank "spiking" within the Advanced Freshwater Discussion forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> what i have seen for freshwater vs. saltwater, ... freshwater lives a precarious life, always changing, water levesl change drastically, many species have addapted ...

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Old 03-02-2014, 09:36 AM   #11
 
what i have seen for freshwater vs. saltwater, ...

freshwater lives a precarious life, always changing, water levesl change drastically,

many species have addapted to a life of existance, making it through each year to approach winter and to adapt again as streams run dry, or freeze over, ... such is life when everything changes.

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saltwater things are consistant year after year, month after month, evolution does not need adaptability, it needs survivability, to be smarter than your prey, and to be smarter than your hunter. the water does not change enough to spend evolution worrying about changes in the environment.

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for freshwater to have tanks of drastically different characteristics shows a versatility of evolution for a species that has survived only because it is adaptable to a very large variety of changes. ... indeed some species going as far as to use those changing seasons to it's advantage for propagation & reproduction.

so a tank does not need to have exceedingly strict parameters, ... for the most part

freshwater evolution has timed itself to be attentive to the changing water conditions, as water conditions change and reach certain optimal ranges breeding seasons are started.

temperature changes (season), cleaner water (large rain falls), ... falling of leaves into the rivers, ...

the optimal for breeding does become strict though, ... and without the tank ever reaching those ranges how safe & happy are the inhabitants ?

many species can exist in zoos on basic needs, ... but breeding requires more then the basics
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Old 03-02-2014, 09:43 AM   #12
 
It's not about whether or not there are fluxations in the wild.

It is all about maintaining a healthy stable environment for the livestock that is forgiving of operator error.

Which may not result in a constant environment.

Or an environment which duplicates conditions in the wild.

Last edited by beaslbob; 03-02-2014 at 09:50 AM..
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Old 03-02-2014, 09:54 AM   #13
 
i said nothing other than the fish can exist in wildly different conditions and survive

i also said that breeding requires more than near random conditions that are survivable

i said nothing about trying to maintain a specific set of parameters (aside from breeding)

mention of the range of conditions does not inspire one to duplicate those range of conditions in their tanks, it shows the versatility that evolution has allowed these fish to survive in.

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beaslbob, you are proving your fish are surviving, you are not proving your fish are healthy & happy in their tanks.
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Old 03-02-2014, 10:54 AM   #14
 
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Is there one example in the wild of an environment that does not feature some version of a water change? Even anabantids in bongs and stagnant pools get a rainwater change occasionally.
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:52 AM   #15
 
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Is there one example in the wild of an environment that does not feature some version of a water change? Even anabantids in bongs and stagnant pools get a rainwater change occasionally.

There are the lakes in Chile. A large desert near the pacific with lakes and no rain . Hoowweevverr.. I'm pretty certain they don't support fish life .. Or hardly even plant life.


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Old 03-02-2014, 12:16 PM   #16
 
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There are the lakes in Chile. A large desert near the pacific with lakes and no rain . Hoowweevverr.. I'm pretty certain they don't support fish life .. Or hardly even plant life.


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And they don't dry up?
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Old 03-02-2014, 12:38 PM   #17
 
there are lakes that (usually below sea level) they never get water changes, they just accumulate water from rains and fed by rivers & streams, excess water evaporates, ... water never leaves to take with it any buildup of anything out of the water basin.

like agent 13 said, i don't think these places support any fish life or plant life.

ones i heard of years ago, ... salts may buildup in these lakes as water that feeds them dissolves and takes with it what it can leach out of the ground as it flows towards these lakes.

aside from the lake that may appear in death valley (california) after a heavy rainfall will dry up within a few days. other such lakes i have heard of (i don't remember names) don't dry up entirely
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Old 03-02-2014, 01:12 PM   #18
 
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And they don't dry up?
Apparently not.. But they do become high in salt.
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Old 03-02-2014, 01:27 PM   #19
 
Most lakes and rivers have larger ground water inputs then rainwater. But lakes can vary depending on region and elevation. Typically more acidic conditions in heavily rainwater fed locations, however there must be groundwater input or bedrock leaching to replenish buffers. The amazon is neutral-acidic and predominately rainwater fed which gives it the massive floods that induce spawning and the dry season were many transient rivers dry up along with the fish in them. Compared to the great African lakes that are heavily growndwater fed, very deep and in contact with bedrock. They are basic lakes, most lakes are neutral to basic. The bacterial nitrogen cycle in our tank actually has an acidifying effect over a long term. Despite how adaptive fish are, aquatic ecosystems are not. There are thousands of lakes that have had ecosystem collapses due to acid rain and are now fishless, the actual change of 1-2pH isn't deadly for the fish but it doesn't have to be to indirectly kill them off when they are dependent on the ecosystem.

Everything has to balance out eventually. That is the issue here. Conditions can fluctuate but it has to be back and forth. No natural aquatic ecosystem can manage that without multiple inputs and outputs.

Bacteria and plants are in direct competition for ammonia. One can not usually out-compete the other IMO. Plants have a higher affinity to uptake ammonia then nitrates so they will do that until there is no ammonia present. A filtered tank is going to favor BB bacteria more then plants, giving the bacteria a high flow high O2 location. Every tank is different due to the different conditions. These have an effect on ammonia when your comparing plants to bacteria. Silent cycling is nothing new, any planted tank can do it when setup correctly.
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Old 03-02-2014, 05:10 PM   #20
 
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...they just accumulate water from rains and fed by rivers & streams, excess water evaporates, ...
Sounds like water changes to me.
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