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My aquarium gets hazy/cloudy after every water change

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My aquarium gets hazy/cloudy after every water change
Old 09-10-2013, 10:17 AM   #11
 
Hope you get this fixed.


FWIW I don't have those problems but then I use a planted setup and do no water changes.

my .02
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Old 09-19-2013, 10:04 PM   #12
 
I have a similar issue in my tank and I noticed it gets better when I have my UV filter going.

I didn't realize how important it is to test your tap water and determine if it would be okay for your fish. That's one of those things you learn after the fact. I recently learned that my tap water has nitrates in it which is why I can't seem to get my nitrates down. I have a deionized water filter that I use on occasion to help keep the levels down and it works well but I have to add chemicals to raise the GH and the kh. So it seems like I'm only trading one for the other.

Darcy

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Old 09-20-2013, 03:37 PM   #13
 
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Originally Posted by dandries View Post
I have a similar issue in my tank and I noticed it gets better when I have my UV filter going.

I didn't realize how important it is to test your tap water and determine if it would be okay for your fish. That's one of those things you learn after the fact. I recently learned that my tap water has nitrates in it which is why I can't seem to get my nitrates down. I have a deionized water filter that I use on occasion to help keep the levels down and it works well but I have to add chemicals to raise the GH and the kh. So it seems like I'm only trading one for the other.

Darcy

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I respectifully disagree.

the reason you couldn't keep nitrates down is you didn't have enough nitrate consumers. Where the nitrates come from is irrelevant.

still just my .02
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:31 AM   #14
 
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bob, my understanding is that most aquatic plants prefer ammonia, straight up. But some like nitrate more, even nitrite for a perverse few.

What plants would belly up for nitrate rather than ammonia?
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Old 10-06-2013, 01:01 PM   #15
 
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Hallyx I have always read that aquatic plants do prefer ammonia as a source of food. If there is none available then they use the nitrates BUT they have to use up stored energy to convert the nitrates back to ammonia.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:42 AM   #16
 
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Right. In fact, if I have this straight, they ionize the ammonia into ammonium and use that for food...or to break off the C from CO2 for plant mass.
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Old 10-07-2013, 09:10 AM   #17
 
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Originally Posted by Hallyx View Post
bob, my understanding is that most aquatic plants prefer ammonia, straight up. But some like nitrate more, even nitrite for a perverse few.

What plants would belly up for nitrate rather than ammonia?

Just about all of them?

(some though can actually use nitrogen gas for nitrogen)

What happens is say you start with a totally pristine (bacteria free) aquarium with plants.

Then add some kind of bio load like a fish.

The aquarium and fish produce urea and co2 which is almost immediately reduced to ammonia and co2. the plants consume the ammonia and co2. Then as bacteria spread, more and more bacteria reduce the ammonia to nitrites just like the classical aerobic bacteria cycle states.

As more and more ammonia is reduced by the bacteria the plants reluctantly start consumeing nitrates for nitrogen. So that when the aerobic bacteria cycle is fully established the plants do actually consume nitrates.

Meanwhile during that initial cycle there were no or very low ammonia/nitrIte spikes and low co2 and higher oxygen. The only initial spike might have been a small nitrate spike as some aquarium materials have nitrates in them like substrates. And during that cycle the plants are using ammonia not nitrates.

But explaining all that to newbies just learning about the cycle can be confusing.

So I just state add plants and look at the results.

my .02
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Old 10-14-2013, 06:18 PM   #18
 
Alright, let me first apologize as I only read a little of what was posted and may have overlooked a few things.

I noticed you said you treated your water once with some anti-bacterial meds.

All anti-bacterial meds target bacteria and can disrupt your "good bacteria" - specifically, the ones involved in your nitrogen cycle. In short, one way to deal with a hampered system after using medications, you can get yourself some more bacteria in a bottle - check out Amazon.com: API Quick Start Water Conditioner for Aquariums, 16-Ounce: Pet Supplies. Also, before you resort to medications next time, use aquarium salt. It's a general treatment and may solve your fish health problems without the costly expense of medications and the adverse effects on your biological filtration. Also, water changes. If that doesn't solve your issue, then go onto the strong stuff like anti-bacterial meds.

I also noticed you mentioned something about your pH dropping suddenly.

What I didn't see was where is the water source you're using when doing water changes? I'm assuming tap water and not bottled water or something else? A sudden drop in pH could be due to a lack of minerals, I forget what it's called, general hardness? gH/kH one of the two. Anyway, you can add something like limestone or crushed coral to raise the pH in your tank and keep it more stable at a higher number. Gravel, like those chunky rocks, are also for this purpose.

You could chemically treat your water source (I'm assuming you're getting it from tap water) with "pH Up" or whatever product in a bucket before putting it in the tank. You can also just stick on a hang-on-filter and run the water over some limestone for the same effect.

For further water clarity
Do you use activated carbon in your filters? It can remove the tiniest of particles and help clarify water generally. You can also add finer sponges in your filters (polisher). Lastly, you can always add more filters (but I'm sure you have plenty already).

Finally
Have you tested your water source against your tank source?
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:43 AM   #19
 
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Originally Posted by Hallyx View Post
bob, my understanding is that most aquatic plants prefer ammonia, straight up. But some like nitrate more, even nitrite for a perverse few.

What plants would belly up for nitrate rather than ammonia?

I got my first response backwards.

Most plants from what I understand vastly prefer ammonia over nitrate and in fact use less energy using ammonia for nitrogen then using nitrates for nitrogen.

But then I have been know to be backwards in the past.

.02
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Old 10-29-2013, 11:56 AM   #20
 
ammonium is preferred over nitrates, ...

1. ammonium
2. nitrate
3. nitrite
... we're really dealing with a new tank at this point or a major problem
ammonia, not sure where that sits

Edit:
keep notes, they're helpful
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