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the beaslbob build

This is a discussion on the beaslbob build within the Advanced Freshwater Discussion forums, part of the Freshwater Fish and Aquariums category; --> plants also consume nutrients in the water column that would otherwise raise the PH (not just CO2) would have me thinking, the cap lowers ...

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Old 11-01-2013, 05:15 PM   #11
 
plants also consume nutrients in the water column that would otherwise raise the PH (not just CO2)

would have me thinking, the cap lowers the rate nutrients are released into the water column till it's slow enough the plants can keep the levels in the water column down

I have heard peat moss (sphagnum peat moss) when alive, can hold up to 40% of it's mass as water to deal with long periods without rain (or other sources of water to hydrate it). as this turns into a large store of water, the moss's natural defense to keep this water free from an infection is to keep this water acidic. I THINK this is where adding peat moss to substrates is done in an attempt to keep the PH lower.

i would think, (from your tests) this is more of an old-wives-tale than reality, ... (but honestly i don't know)
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Old 11-01-2013, 05:31 PM   #12
 
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Originally Posted by Flear View Post
plants also consume nutrients in the water column that would otherwise raise the PH (not just CO2)

would have me thinking, the cap lowers the rate nutrients are released into the water column till it's slow enough the plants can keep the levels in the water column down

I have heard peat moss (sphagnum peat moss) when alive, can hold up to 40% of it's mass as water to deal with long periods without rain (or other sources of water to hydrate it). as this turns into a large store of water, the moss's natural defense to keep this water free from an infection is to keep this water acidic. I THINK this is where adding peat moss to substrates is done in an attempt to keep the PH lower.

i would think, (from your tests) this is more of an old-wives-tale than reality, ... (but honestly i don't know)
I think it does act to lower the pH but after a few weeks the plants sucking out the co2 overrides the effect.

Also read on a canadian peat moss site that for soil it actually hold ammonia to be released later.

If that is true then it should also help trap ammonia in our tanks durint the initial cycle.

my .02
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:02 PM   #13
 
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When you clean your substrate once or twice a year as you stated.. about what percentage of your water volume would you say you tend to change? I'm just wondering how you clean it when you say you never do water changes..is there a certain amount that doesn't count? Or do you have one of those eheim vacs?

Does the tank by all appearances look clean when kept this way?
Sorry if this seems like an interrogation but I'm trying to get a complete view of your fish keeping method. Or maybe it's more the Aquarium keeping method then the fish themselves I'm "investigating" (Since I think for the most part we keep vastly different fish aside from maybe my kids 16g tank)
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Old 11-01-2013, 11:15 PM   #14
 
i've heard humus does that, if i remember correctly, it's like MTS (mineralized top soil) without the mess, i also think it might have a source of ammonia for a nitrogen source for the plants, ... i'm a lot less sure about the ammonia part though
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:03 AM   #15
 
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When you clean your substrate once or twice a year as you stated.. about what percentage of your water volume would you say you tend to change? I'm just wondering how you clean it when you say you never do water changes..is there a certain amount that doesn't count? Or do you have one of those eheim vacs?

Does the tank by all appearances look clean when kept this way?
Sorry if this seems like an interrogation but I'm trying to get a complete view of your fish keeping method. Or maybe it's more the Aquarium keeping method then the fish themselves I'm "investigating" (Since I think for the most part we keep vastly different fish aside from maybe my kids 16g tank)
I remove as little water as possible when cleaning up the substrate.

Water looks clear when dont correctly. With higher lighting and feeding it does get cloudy. I a totally dark tank the water remain clear. So the "trick" is to hit a balace where you have healthy plants and fish with clear water.

my .02
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:50 AM   #16
 
parameters and pictures

Better late then never.

(Wish admin would move to my original post.)



here is a such as it is picture of a 20g long. Notice the "high tech" lighting.






Here is the cycle parameters of that 20g long FW


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Old 11-03-2013, 11:38 AM   #17
 
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Water looks clear when dont correctly.
my .02
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Originally Posted by beaslbob View Post


here is a such as it is picture of a 20g long. Notice the "high tech" lighting.



I though you said the water would look clear when done correctly..did you do something wrong *Not judging ! Ducks head * lol Sorry I couldn't stop my fingers from typing. I'm a little anal retentive I confess. I'm that mom who is up till 2am cleaning up till the house looks like the kids were never there.
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Old 11-03-2013, 01:42 PM   #18
 
actually the water is clear but there is a slight algae on the back glass
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Old 11-03-2013, 02:38 PM   #19
 
i've got algae all over in my tank, ... i am looking for different algae, but dono what i could find that would suit my purposes, ...

there is the typical algae types, long and stringy, short and bushy, or forming fluffy clumps, shades of green or black (cyano aside),

actually cyano has me curious about nitrates as well, i came across something (one thing only actually) that mentioned cyanobacteria can increase nitrates directly from N2, ... most cyanobacterias are toxic, but i think some are safe. a random thought for dealing with planted tanks that have a nitrogen deficiency.

but with other algae types, than the typical ones that affect most peoples freshwater tanks, i'm sure some have some rather unique appearances and may be rather nice to have in a tank. provided they don't get out of hand.
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Old 11-03-2013, 03:02 PM   #20
 
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actually cyano has me curious about nitrates as well, i came across something (one thing only actually) that mentioned cyanobacteria can increase nitrates directly from N2, ... most cyanobacterias are toxic, but i think some are safe. a random thought for dealing with planted tanks that have a nitrogen deficiency.
.
I'm pretty sure it's more the cyanobacteria in marine tanks that are harmful. It can however starve your plants in freshwater but mostly it's just ugly and difficult if it gets out of control. It's really already in small amounts in all places on earth but only noticeable when given the right circumstances to "bloom" .
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